Category Archives: Homeschooling

Third Grade

Kindergarten (2)

Arts

  • Perform and create artistic movements and patterns
  • Identify melody, rhythm, harmony, and timbre in musical selections
  • Respond to sounds and sound patterns with body movements
  • Improvise music with classroom instruments
  • Listen, describe, and respond to a variety of music
  • Read and write patterns with musical notes
  • Identify some common musical instruments by sight and sound
  • Identify some musical forms
  • Sing age-appropriate songs with accuracy from memory
  • Improvise dramatizations of stories or ideas
  • Take part in writing scripts, designing sets, and performing group dramas
  • Create costumes and props for a performance
  • Observe patterns in nature and works of art
  • Identify and describe elements in works of visual art (line, color, texture, shapes/form, space, value)
  • Create original works of visual art in various media and dimensions
  • Express observations, ideas, or feelings through music, drama, or visual art
  • Identify and discuss some well-known works of dance, drama, music, or visual arts and some artists, actors, writers, musicians, choreographers, or composers
  • Analyze a variety of works of dance, music, drama, and visual arts
  • Learn and use vocabulary of dance, music, drama, and visual arts
  • Describe techniques for a given form of art
  • Compare and contrast two works of art
  • Understand how culture affects art and how art reflects culture
  • Demonstrate appropriate audience skills for live artistic performances

Health and Safety

  • Concept and examples of health choices and their consequences
  • Influences on health choices (peers, media, family, community, culture)
  • Elements of and reasons for good personal hygiene
  • Types of nutrients and healthy choices for food
  • Regular participation in active play and other physical activities (contingent on any physical or other limitations)
  • Reasons to get enough sleep and relaxation
  • Strategies for a personal health plan
  • Safety rules for daily and recreational activities (walking, being near streets, water play, riding in a car, biking, etc.)
  • Ways to prevent common childhood injuries (including poisoning)
  • Basic structures and functions of the human body
  • Symptoms of common illnesses; causes of diseases
  • Ways body defends against germs
  • Measures to prevent spread of disease
  • Practicing procedures for response to emergencies, including using telephone
  • Getting out of house or school in event of fire
  • Appropriate skills to identify, avoid, and cope with potentially dangerous situations
  • Identify safe behaviors around strangers
  • Harmful effects of tobacco, alcohol, and drugs on health
  • Understanding of human development and changes
  • Development of self-confidence and self-esteem
  • Respect and consideration for all individuals
  • Ways to identify, express, and manage feelings appropriately
  • Positive social practices with peers, in home, and community
  • Differences between tattling and reporting
  • Bullying, alternative behaviors to bullying, and appropriate responses to bullying
  • Strategies for resolving conflicts with peers and others
  • Skills for meeting people, making friends, and being a good friend
  • Getting personal support from family; communication with family
  • How and where to get help in making health decisions

Language Arts

  • Identify main topic, idea, lesson, moral, or argument in grade-level text
  • Show understanding of key details in a text
  • Identify text evidence to support the author’s message or reader’s responses
  • Retell stories, including tales from diverse cultures
  • Describe characters in a story and how characters’ actions contribute to the plot
  • Determine meanings of words or phrases as used in a text
  • Describe effects and uses of words and phrases in passages
  • Describe overall structure of a passage and its effect on the message
  • Describe how parts of a story, poem, or drama build on other parts
  • Use text features and search tools to locate relevant information
  • Explain connections between events, ideas, concepts, or steps in a text
  • Explain differences in points of view of characters, narrators, or writers
  • Explain differences between an author’s point of view and their own
  • Explain how visual images and graphics contribute to and clarify a text
  • Compare and contrast themes, settings, plots, or ideas in two texts on the same topic or by the same author
  • By the end of the academic year, read and understand grade-level literary and informational texts at grade level independently and with proficiency
  • Express ideas and feelings clearly
  • Speak clearly and audibly in sensible sentences
  • Describe people, places, things, and events with relevant details
  • Add visual components to a speech to clarify ideas, feelings, and thoughts
  • Give and follow simple two-step directions
  • Participate in conversations with diverse partners and groups
  • Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions
  • Listen and respond to others with focus and care
  • Ask and answer questions about key details in a text or in an oral presentation
  • Present a report or tell a story with appropriate facts and relevant details
  • Create audio recordings of stories or poems
  • Apply grade-level phonics and word analysis skills in reading words
  • Know meanings of most common prefixes and suffixes
  • Decode irregularly spelled grade-level words and multi-syllable words
  • Read grade-level texts with purpose and understanding
  • Orally read grade-level texts with accuracy, expression, and appropriate rate
  • Confirm and self-correct words during oral reading
  • Use context clues to determine word and phrase meanings
  • Use word structure clues to determine word meanings
  • Use synonyms and antonyms to clarify and explain word meanings
  • Use dictionaries and glossaries (print and digital) to determine or clarify word meaning
  • Understand and use figurative language (similes, metaphors, idioms, adages, proverbs, etc.)
  • Distinguish literal and nonliteral meanings of words in context
  • Distinguish shades of meanings among related words
  • Learn and use grade-level general academic vocabulary
  • Identify nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs and their functions in specific sentences
  • Form and use regular and irregular nouns and verbs and verb tenses
  • Form and use conjunctions, superlative adjectives, and superlative adverbs
  • Produce complete simple, compound, and complex sentences
  • Capitalize proper nouns and appropriate words in titles
  • Use end punctuation, commas, and apostrophes
  • Punctuate dialogue correctly
  • Use grade-level spelling patterns and rules
  • Consult reference materials to check spellings
  • Correctly use the English language when speaking, reading, or writing
  • Know when to use formal and informal English
  • Write opinion, informative, or explanatory pieces that state a topic or purpose, supply relevant facts and reasons, and present a conclusion
  • Write stories that include details, put events in order, and provide a conclusion
  • Make improvements and needed changes to written work
  • Use transitional words and phrases to connect ideas
  • Add dialogue and descriptions to develop characters and events
  • Take part in shared research and writing projects
  • Conduct short research task on a topic or question
  • Gather information from print and digital sources and take notes
  • Create written and visual works to summarize and share information
  • Use tools, including digital tools, to produce and publish writing
  • Write regularly for a variety of tasks, purposes, and audiences

Math

  • Tell and write time to nearest minute
  • Solve word problems involving addition and subtraction of time
  • Measure and estimate liquid volumes and masses of objects
  • Solve word problems involving four operations with masses or volumes
  • Generate measurement data, measuring lengths to halves and fourths of an inch
  • Understand how concepts of area relate to multiplication and to addition
  • Recognize and measure perimeter
  • Measure areas by counting unit squares
  • Multiply side lengths to find areas of rectangles in real-world problems
  • Recognize area as additive
  • Solve real-world and mathematical problems involving perimeters of polygons
  • Use tiles and pictures to represent areas
  • Understand that data are sets of individual numerical facts or measurements
  • Interpret information and solve problems from data on graphs and tables
  • Draw a picture graph or scaled bar graph to represent a set of data
  • Understand products as total number of objects in a number of same-size groups
  • Understand quotients as the number of objects in each share when a total is equally partitioned
  • Understand division as a problem of finding an unknown factor
  • Know from memory all products of two one-digit numbers
  • Apply commutative, associative, and distributive properties to multiply and divide
  • Multiply and divide fluently within 100
  • Find unknown numbers in multiplication or division problems within 100
  • Use drawings and equations with a symbol to represent an unknown number
  • Solve two-step word problems involving the four operations
  • Identify arithmetic patterns (5 times a number always ends in 5 or 0)
  • Assess the reasonableness of answers (using estimation and mental calculation)
  • Understand a fraction as a quantity formed when a whole is partitioned into equal parts
  • Understand that a unit fraction (1/b) is the quantity formed by one part when the whole is partitioned into b equal parts
  • Represent fractions on a number line diagram
  • Compare fractions by reasoning about their size
  • Explain the concept of fraction equivalence
  • Recognize and generate simple equivalent fractions
  • Create models to show equivalent fractions
  • Identify and describe a variety of 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional shapes
  • Understand that shapes in different categories may share attributes
  • Understand that rectangles, rhombuses, squares, and trapezoids are all quadrilaterals
  • Categorize shapes by their attributes
  • Partition shapes into equal areas, describing each part as a unit fraction of the whole (for a shape partitioned into 6 parts with equal area, each part is 1/6 of the whole)
  • Understand and use place value to 1,000
  • Round numbers to the nearest 10 or 100
  • Add and subtract within 1,000 using place value understandings
  • Multiply one-digit whole numbers by multiples of 10

Science

  • Weather and climate patterns and predictions
  • Climate variations
  • Natural hazards resulting from natural processes
  • Life cycles of plants and animals
  • Plant and animal adaptation and survival
  • Plant and animal behaviors
  • Learned and inherited traits of living things
  • Variations of inherited traits
  • Relationships between traits of organisms and their survival
  • Influence of environment on plant and animal traits
  • Relationships in an ecosystem
  • Effects of environmental changes on organisms in the environment
  • Animal behavior and social interactions
  • Evidence of extinct plant and animals
  • Biodiversity
  • Physical properties of matter (size, shape, weight, volume, flexibility, luster, color, texture, hardness, odor, etc.)
  • Forms of energy (heat, sound, chemical, mechanical, and electrical)
  • Heat release and transfer
  • Energy transformations (such as heat to light)
  • Interactions of matter and energy
  • Sound (pitch, vibrations, volume) and how sound travels
  • Sizes and kinds of forces, including gravity
  • Relationships between force and motion
  • Effects of balanced and unbalanced forces on an object
  • Patterns and measurements of an object’s motion
  • Electric or magnetic interactions between objects not in contact with each other
  • Simple machines

Social Science – World Communities

  • Uniqueness of the history of each community or culture
  • Ways cultural history is passed from one generation to the next (legends, oral histories, folktales, etc.)
  • Key events in history of selected world communities
  • Key places and people in history of selected world communities
  • Timelines of historical features of selected world communities
  • Technological developments in transportation and communication in selected world communities
  • Development of trade in selected world communities
  • Available resources, human and natural, for the selected world community
  • How the selected community uses resources to meet basic needs and wants
  • Concepts of surplus and scarcity in relation to the selected community
  • Ways of meeting basic needs of food, clothing, and shelter in the selected community
  • Ways people earn a living now and in the past in the selected community
  • Goods and services produced in each selected community
  • Goods products or services exported and imported in the selected community
  • The role of trade in the selected community
  • Comparison of family and school activities in own community with those of selected world communities
  • Comparison of cultural traditions in own community with those of selected world communities
  • Components of culture and diversity of communities (language, customs, traditions, beliefs, practices, celebrations)
  • Cultural features, traditions, and symbols of selected world communities
  • Arts, music, dance, and literature of selected world communities
  • Concept of cultural diffusion and how it happens
  • Comparison of effects of cultural communities in selected world communities on people, ideas, practices, and products
  • Earth’s equator, hemispheres, continents, and oceans
  • Earth’s regions
  • Earth’s grid system (lines of latitude and longitude)
  • Understanding of map features and use, including scale
  • Comparing locations of selected world communities to one’s own country
  • Use of a variety of maps to locate and examine selected world communities
  • Political and physical features of selected communities
  • Ways physical and climate features influence people in selected communities
  • Use of maps to identify one’s own location and relative locations
  • Location of one’s own local land, regions, river systems, and highways
  • Physical and human features of state (or province, territory) and neighboring states (or provinces, territories)
  • How geographical features affect population patterns
  • Human adaptations to the geography of the specified world community
  • Construction of maps, tables, graphs, charts
  • Concept of democracy and principles of democratic government
  • Type of government in the selected community; comparison to other governments
  • How leaders are chosen in the selected world community
  • How problems are solved in the selected world community
  • Ways the government keeps people safe, maintains order, provides for needs
  • Role of citizens in the selected community
  • Concept of universal human rights of fair treatment and fulfillment of needs
  • Examination of the concept of human rights in the selected community

Technology

  • Concepts, characteristics, and real-life uses of technology
  • Basic parts of technology systems and basic technological devices
  • Continued development of keyboard skills
  • Opening, closing, saving, sending, and storing files, applications, and programs
  • Effective use of available grade-level technology
  • Use of tools and devices to complete tasks and solve problems
  • Use of tools to produce creative original works
  • Use of tools to interact and exchange ideas with peers, teacher, parents, or other students
  • Use of tools and devices to develop cultural understanding
  • Use of tools to access information for an inquiry project
  • Exploring virtual environments, simulations, programs, models, and applications
  • Participation in group collaborative interactive projects and activities
  • Developing, printing, and publishing in print and digital formats
  • Evaluating content, applications, and programs
  • Digital citizenship, etiquette, fair use guidelines, and copyrights
  • Practice of safe online behavior
  • Responsible care of digital equipment
  • Positive attitudes toward technology for learning
  • Demonstrating openness to learning and using new technologies

By the end of third grade, you can expect your child to:

  • Work cooperatively and productively with other children in small groups to complete projects
  • Understand how choices affect consequences
  • Become more organized and logical in her thinking processes
  • Build stronger friendships
  • Be helpful, cheerful, and pleasant as well as rude, bossy, selfish, and impatient
  • Be more influenced by peer pressure because friends are very important at this stage
  • Like immediate rewards for behavior
  • Be able to copy from a chalkboard
  • Be able to write neatly in cursive because the small muscles of the hand have developed
  • Read longer stories and chapter books with expression and comprehension
  • Use prefixes, suffixes, and root words and other strategies to identify unfamiliar words
  • Multiply single- and multi-digit numbers
  • Divide multi-digit numbers by one-digit numbers
  • Tell time to the half-hour and quarter-hour and to five minutes and one minute

Second Grade

Kindergarten (1)

Arts

  • Perform and describe movement activities
  • Imitate simple movement patterns; learn simple dances
  • Create and demonstrate improvised movements
  • Read, write, and perform simple patterns of sounds and rhythms
  • Describe musical forms
  • Read and write patterns with musical notes
  • Identify some musical instruments by sight and sound
  • Sing age-appropriate songs with accuracy
  • Play accompaniments on classroom instruments
  • Improvise simple rhythms
  • Dramatize or improvise simple stories
  • Act out events or stories using language and props
  • Describe patterns in nature and works of art
  • Create and share original works of visual art in various media and dimensions
  • Create two- and three-dimensional works of art
  • Mix colors; draw or paint a still life
  • Use visual and actual texture in original works of art
  • Express observations, ideas, or feelings through music, drama, or visual art
  • Identify and discuss some well-known works of dance, drama, music, and visual arts and some artists, actors, writers, musicians, choreographers, or composers
  • Learn and use vocabulary of dance, music, drama, and visual arts
  • Describe and respond to works of visual art
  • Observe and respond to dance, music, and drama productions
  • Demonstrate appropriate audience skills for live performances

Health and Safety

  • Define and give examples of health choices and their consequences
  • Practice good personal hygiene
  • Take measures to prevent spread of disease
  • Identify and make healthy food choices
  • Discuss how food choices are influenced by peers, media, family, and community
  • Identify types of play and exercise that are good for the body
  • Participate regularly in active play and other physical activities (contingent on any physical or other limitations)
  • Understand reasons to get enough sleep and relaxation
  • Follow safety rules during play and daily activities (walking, being near streets, water play, riding in a car, biking, etc.)
  • Discuss and practice ways to prevent common childhood injuries, including poisoning
  • Name objects that may be dangerous
  • Recognize and discuss symptoms of common illnesses and diseases
  • Explain causes and symptoms of common illnesses and diseases
  • Know the basic structures and functions of the human body
  • Identify in simple terms ways body defends against germs
  • Identify health services in own community
  • Distinguish between helpful and harmful situations
  • Recognize and follow practices for responding to emergencies
  • Know how to use a telephone in an emergency; provide name, address, telephone number
  • Know how to get out of house or school in event of fire
  • Show appropriate behavior during fire, earthquake, and other disaster drills
  • Display appropriate skills to identify, avoid, report, and cope with potentially dangerous situations
  • Identify safe behaviors around strangers
  • Identify ways to get help if feeling unsafe, threatened, or abused
  • Explain and practice refusal skills to avoid unsafe behavior situations
  • Show development of self confidence and self esteem
  • Demonstrate respect and consideration for all individuals
  • Develop and display effective communication skills in social interactions
  • Identify, express, and manage feelings appropriately
  • Show positive social and practices with peers, in home, and community
  • Show understanding of and respect for individual differences
  • Identify and discuss bullying behaviors and alternative behaviors to bullying
  • Describe appropriate responses to bullying of self or others
  • Describe how to get help in solving conflicts with peers
  • Explain and practice skills for meeting people and making friends

Language Arts

  • Know sounds for two letters that represent one sound
  • Read regularly spelled one-syllable words (words that follow general spelling rules)
  • Know that a final e teams up with a common vowel to make long vowel sounds
  • Identify number and separation of syllables
  • Break words into syllables to help with reading
  • Read words with inflectional endings
  • Recognize and read many grade-appropriate words with regular and irregular spellings
  • Create new words with two- or three-letter initial sounds
  • Use phonics and word analysis skills to read unknown words
  • Identify main topic, idea, or argument in grade-level text
  • Show understanding of key details in a text
  • Find evidence in the text to support the author’s message or reader’s responses
  • Retell stories including tales from diverse cultures
  • Describe main message, lesson, or moral from stories or other texts
  • Describe actions and responses of characters in a story
  • Determine meanings of words or phrases relevant to the topic
  • Describe effects and uses of words and phrases in passages
  • Describe overall structure of a passage and its effect on the message
  • Find connections between a series of events, ideas, concepts, or steps in a text
  • Identify differences in points of view of characters
  • Explain how visual images and graphics contribute to and clarify a text
  • Compare and contrast different versions of the same story or texts on the same topic
  • Use texts to find information and answer questions following a step-by-step inquiry process
  • Take part in shared research and writing projects, gathering information for a specific purpose
  • Demonstrate the ability to discuss, clarify, and summarize
  • By the end of the academic year, read and understand grade-level literary and informational text at grade level independently and with proficiency
  • Use legible printing skills
  • Correctly use collective nouns, regular and irregular plural nouns, reflexive pronouns, adjectives, and adverbs
  • Produce complete simple and compound sentences
  • Capitalize names, including holidays, product names, and geographic names
  • Use end punctuation, commas, and apostrophes
  • Use simple, common spelling rules for age level
  • Use of beginning dictionaries and other reference materials
  • Correctly use the English language when speaking, reading, or writing
  • Know when to use formal and informal English
  • Apply grade-level phonics and word analysis skills in reading words
  • Decode irregularly spelled grade-level words
  • Read grade-level texts with purpose and understanding
  • Orally read grade-level texts with accuracy, expression, and appropriate rate
  • Confirm and self-correct words during oral reading
  • Write opinion, informative, or explanatory pieces that state a topic or purpose, supply relevant facts and reasons, and give a conclusion
  • Write stories that include details, put events in order, and provide a conclusion
  • Make improvements and needed changes to written work
  • Use tools, including digital tools, to produce and publish writing
  • Take part in shared research and writing projects
  • Gather information from various sources to answer a question
  • Create written and visual works to summarize and share information
  • Express ideas and feelings clearly
  • Speak clearly and audibly in sensible sentences
  • Describe people, places, things, and events with relevant details
  • Add illustrations, graphics, or other visual components) to a speech to clarify ideas, feelings, and thoughts
  • Give and follow simple two-step directions
  • Participate in conversations with diverse partners and groups
  • Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions
  • Listen to and respond to others with focus and care
  • Ask and answer questions about key details in a text or in an oral presentation
  • Tell an experience with appropriate facts, relevant details
  • Create audio recordings of stories or poems

Math

  • Represent (with equations, drawings, or objects) and solve 1- or 2-step addition and subtraction problems within 100
  • Mentally add and subtract within 20 fluently
  • Work with equal groups of objects to build foundations for multiplication
  • Use addition to find total number of objects arranged in rectangular arrays of rows and columns
  • Choose appropriate tools and units to measure lengths
  • Measure and estimate lengths using inches, feet, centimeters, and meters
  • Measure to compare lengths of objects
  • Solve addition and subtraction word problems involving same-unit lengths
  • Write an equation to represent a problem, using a symbol for the unknown number
  • Represent whole numbers as lengths on a number line
  • Represent sums and differences within 100 on a number line
  • Tell and write time (using a.m. and p.m.) to the nearest five minutes
  • Explain relationships between seconds, minutes, hours, and days
  • Understand the values and relationships among dollar bills and coins (or local denominations)
  • Solve word problems involving dollar bills and coins (or local denominations)
  • Generate measurement data
  • Represent data on a bar graph or circle graph
  • Analyze and solve problems with data on line plots, picture graphs, or bar graphs
  • Recognize and draw shapes with specified attributes
  • Identify triangles, quadrilaterals, pentagons, hexagons, cubes
  • Partition a rectangle into rows and columns of same size squares
  • Describe a whole as two halves, three thirds, or four fourths
  • Read, write, count, and compare numbers up to 1,000
  • Identify a number as odd or even
  • Understand and explain place value through one thousands
  • Understand 100 as a bundle of ten tens
  • Understand 100 as referring to one hundred, 0 tens, and 0 ones
  • Skip count by twos, fives, tens, and hundreds within 1,000
  • Understand the concept of zero
  • Write numbers up to four digits in expanded form to show place value (Example: 1,234 = 1,000 + 200 + 30 + 4)
  • Mentally add 10 to or subtract 10 from any given number 100-1,000
  • Use understanding of place value and properties of operations to add and subtract
  • Add and subtract within 1,000 using models, drawings, or place value strategies
  • Estimate sums and differences with multiples of 10 or 100

Science

  • History of planet Earth
  • Changes in Earth and Earth’s surface (slow and fast)
  • Changes caused by wind and water
  • Ideas about ways to slow or prevent changes from wind and water
  • Roles, descriptions, and locations of water (including ice) on Earth’s surface
  • Formation, properties, components, and types of soil
  • Physical properties and classifications of rocks
  • Biodiversity of living things in any region
  • Plant needs, parts, functions, and structures
  • Plant growth and pollination
  • Plant reproduction
  • Inherited traits in plants
  • Plant life cycles and life spans
  • Plant responses to environment
  • Different states of matter: solid, liquid, gas
  • Description and classification of matter by observable properties
  • Effects of temperature on matter
  • Changes in states of matter
  • Relative positions of objects
  • Forces: push and pull
  • Relationships between force and motion
  • Characteristics and effects of gravity

Social Science

  • Native American tribes in various regions of North America (or indigenous peoples of home continent [Africa, Antarctica, Asia, Australia, Europe, South America, Oceania/Pacific Islands])
  • Impact of European immigrants on Native American life (or impact of European and other immigrants on indigenous peoples of home continent [Africa, Antarctica, Asia, Australia, Europe, South America, Oceania/Pacific Islands])
  • Reasons people came to America and the United States (or home country) throughout history
  • Importance of Ellis Island and Statue of Liberty
  • Current and continuing immigration to the United States (or home country)
  • Cultural influences and contributions of immigrants
  • Terms and measures of time sequence
  • Origins and significance of community, state (or provincial, territorial), and national landmarks
  • Sequencing events and using time period designations
  • Using vocabulary related to chronologyKey people, events, and developments in own community and region
  • People in the past who have influenced community developments
  • Comparison of local history to other communities or region
  • Settling of people–why and where
  • Time periods (decades, centuries, millennia)
  • Creating and interpreting timelines for past and present events
  • Key historical figures and their contributions to U.S. (home country) history
  • Major inventions and their effects
  • Local history and people
  • Effects of science and technology through history
  • Needs for rules, laws, and services in a community
  • How groups solve problems and promote justice
  • Appropriate and inappropriate uses of power
  • Names and roles of some current pubic officials, including local leaders
  • Characteristics (and practices) of responsible citizenship
  • Reasons for and functions of government
  • Government services in the community
  • Ways groups resolve conflicts or differences
  • Elections and the voting process; participation in voting
  • Purpose and collection of taxes
  • Symbols, individuals, events, and documents that represent the United States (or home country)
  • Basic understandings of the purpose of the United States Constitution (or similar document in home country)
  • Some principles of democracy in the United Sates (or home country)
  • Rights in the United States (or home country) and guarantees of rights
  • Elements of culture
  • Culture as a reflection of the life, beliefs, and values of the people
  • Significance of art, literature, dance, music in a culture
  • Significance of various ethnic and cultural celebrations
  • Contributions of various cultures to a society
  • Effects of science and technology on human life and culture
  • Relative location of home and community in state (or province or territory), nation, and world
  • Using geographic terms and tools to describe space and place
  • Using, interpreting, and creating maps (including digital) and globes
  • Using cardinal directions (north, south, east, west) to locate places
  • Physical and human features of specific communities (including own)
  • Labeling continents, oceans, North and South Poles, equator, and prime meridian
  • Location of countries and major features in home continent (Africa, Antarctica, Asia, Australia, Europe, North America, South America, Oceania/Pacific Islands)
  • Relationships between physical geography and people’s lives and activities
  • Settlement patterns and their connections to geography
  • Population density
  • Natural resources of a place, including human resources
  • Ways people can conserve and replenish natural resources
  • Urban, suburban, and rural communities
  • Limitation of resources leading to economic choices
  • Supply of goods and services based on consumer demands
  • National trade to exchange goods and services
  • Personal costs and benefits of saving and spending
  • Differences between producing and consuming
  • Roles of producers and consumers in production of goods and services
  • Value of work and reasons people work
  • Tracing the development of a product from a natural resource to finished product
  • Saving to reach financial goals
  • Local businesses and their goods and services
  • Identifying resources, including human resources
  • Interdependence of people, regions, and nations in economic activities

Technology

  • Identify basic parts of technology systems (computer, tablet, mouse, keyboard, printer, etc.)
  • Identify and use devices for word processing and running software
  • Demonstrate beginning keyboard skills
  • Know how to open, close, save, and store files and programs
  • Demonstrate responsible care and use of digital equipment
  • Identify uses of technology in daily living
  • Use tools to access and retrieve information
  • Design original works using digital tools
  • Interact with peers, teacher, parents, or other students using digital tools
  • Use digital tools to publish individual or group creations
  • Increase awareness of other groups and cultures through technology use
  • Identify and define real-life problem or question to investigate
  • Follow a plan to locate, process, and use information digitally
  • Summarize and evaluate information gained digitally
  • Understand and practice safe, responsible use of technology
  • Practice a positive attitude toward using technology for learning
  • Show openness to learning new technologies

By the end of second grade, you can expect your child to:

  • Begin to reason and concentrate
  • Improve his ability to process information
  • Work cooperatively with a partner or small group
  • Understand the difference between right and wrong
  • Make connections between concepts so he will be better able to compare and contrast ideas
  • Expand his vocabulary
  • Read fluently with expression
  • Recognize most irregularly spelled words such as because and upon
  • Begin to use a dictionary
  • Add single- and multi-digit numbers with regrouping
  • Tell time to the quarter-hour
  • Know the concept of multiplication (for example, 2 x 3 is two rows of three)

First Grade

Kindergarten (3)

Art

  • Perform and describe movement activities
  • Imitate simple movement patterns; learn simple dances
  • Create and demonstrate improvised movements
  • Read, write, and perform simple patterns of sounds and rhythms
  • Describe musical forms
  • Read and write patterns with musical notes
  • Identify some musical instruments by sight and sound
  • Sing age-appropriate songs with accuracy
  • Play accompaniments on classroom instruments
  • Improvise simple rhythms
  • Dramatize or improvise simple stories
  • Act out events or stories using language and props
  • Describe patterns in nature and works of art
  • Create and share original works of visual art in various media and dimensions
  • Create two- and three-dimensional works of art
  • Mix colors; draw or paint a still life
  • Use visual and actual texture in original works of art
  • Express observations, ideas, or feelings through music, drama, or visual art
  • Identify and discuss some well-known works of dance, drama, music, and visual arts and some artists, actors, writers, musicians, choreographers, or composers
  • Learn and use vocabulary of dance, music, drama, and visual arts
  • Describe and respond to works of visual art
  • Observe and respond to dance, music, and drama productions
  • Demonstrate appropriate audience skills for live performances

Health and Safety

  • Define and give examples of health choices and their consequences
  • Practice good personal hygiene
  • Take measures to prevent spread of disease
  • Identify and make healthy food choices
  • Discuss how food choices are influenced by peers, media, family, and community
  • Identify types of play and exercise that are good for the body
  • Participate regularly in active play and other physical activities (contingent on any physical or other limitations)
  • Understand reasons to get enough sleep and relaxation
  • Follow safety rules during play and daily activities (walking, being near streets, water play, riding in a car, biking, etc.)
  • Discuss and practice ways to prevent common childhood injuries, including poisoning
  • Name objects that may be dangerous
  • Recognize and discuss symptoms of common illnesses and diseases
  • Explain causes and symptoms of common illnesses and diseases
  • Know the basic structures and functions of the human body
  • Identify in simple terms ways body defends against germs
  • Identify health services in own community
  • Distinguish between helpful and harmful situations
  • Recognize and follow practices for responding to emergencies
  • Know how to use a telephone in an emergency; provide name, address, telephone number
  • Know how to get out of house or school in event of fire
  • Show appropriate behavior during fire, earthquake, and other disaster drills
  • Display appropriate skills to identify, avoid, report, and cope with potentially dangerous situations
  • Identify safe behaviors around strangers
  • Identify ways to get help if feeling unsafe, threatened, or abused
  • Explain and practice refusal skills to avoid unsafe behavior situations
  • Show development of self confidence and self esteem
  • Demonstrate respect and consideration for all individuals
  • Develop and display effective communication skills in social interactions
  • Identify, express, and manage feelings appropriately
  • Show positive social and practices with peers, in home, and community
  • Show understanding of and respect for individual differences
  • Identify and discuss bullying behaviors and alternative behaviors to bullying
  • Describe appropriate responses to bullying of self or others
  • Describe how to get help in solving conflicts with peers
  • Explain and practice skills for meeting people and making friends

Language Arts

  • Know sounds for two letters that represent one sound
  • Read regularly spelled one-syllable words (words that follow general spelling rules)
  • Know that a final e teams up with a common vowel to make long vowel sounds
  • Identify number and separation of syllables
  • Break words into syllables to help with reading
  • Read words with inflectional endings
  • Recognize and read many grade-appropriate words with regular and irregular spellings
  • Create new words with two- or three-letter initial sounds
  • Use phonics and word analysis skills to read unknown words
  • Write short pieces that present an opinion, supply reasons, and give a conclusion
  • Write short informative or explanatory pieces that name a topic, give relevant facts, and include a conclusion
  • Write stories (true or fictitious) that include details, put events in order, and provide a conclusion
  • With adult guidance, make improvements and needed changes to written work
  • With adult help, use tools, including digital tools, to produce and publish writing
  • Take part in shared research and writing projects, gathering information for a specific purpose
  • Create written and visual works to summarize and share information gained during research
  • Know and use various text features (table of contents, index, glossary, headings)
  • Explain major differences between texts that tell stories and those that give information
  • Retell stories, relating central ideas and key details
  • Describe main ideas, arguments, or points in informational text
  • Ask and answer questions about key details in a story or other text
  • Describe characters, settings, and events in a story
  • Describe connections between ideas, events, information, or people in a text
  • Connect information to past knowledge about the topic
  • Make predictions about what will happen next in a story
  • Identify who is telling a story at various points in the story
  • Ask and answer questions to learn or clarify meaning of words and phrases used in the text
  • Identify words and phrases in stories or poems that appeal to senses
  • Describe how illustrations connect to a story or informational text
  • Identify author’s purpose and discuss ways the text accomplishes the purpose
  • Compare and contrast adventures, experiences, settings, characters, within a story or in different stories
  • Identify similarities and differences between two texts on the same topic
  • Use texts to find information and answer questions following a step-by-step inquiry process
  • Take part in shared research and writing projects, gathering information for a specific purpose
  • Demonstrate the ability to discuss, clarify, summarize, and evaluate information gained during research
  • Read grade-level texts with accuracy, fluency, and sufficient understanding
  • Determine or clarify meanings of unknown words and phrases and multiple-meaning words from grade-level content
  • Use clues within the sentence to decide the meaning of a word or phrase
  • Use knowledge of prefixes, suffixes, and roots to decode words
  • Create new words from base words
  • With help, show understanding of figurative language
  • Sort words into categories
  • Identify real-life connections between words and their use
  • Distinguish shades of meaning among words with similar meanings
  • Choose the right word for a particular context
  • Use words and phrases gained through reading, conversing, listening,
  • Show understanding of features of sentences and paragraphs
  • Identify, understand, and use compound words
  • Express ideas and feelings clearly
  • Speak in complete sentences when appropriate
  • Participate in conversations with diverse partners and groups
  • Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions
  • Listen to others with focus and care
  • Build on others’ ideas in conversation; respond to comments
  • Describe people, places, things, and events with relevant details
  • Give and follow simple two-step directions
  • Ask questions during reading and instruction for clarification and to gain more information
  • Ask and answer questions to clarify oral presentations to which the student is listening
  • Add drawings or other visual approaches to speaking to clarify ideas, feelings, and thoughts
  • Write all upper and lowercase letters
  • Use and identify common, proper, and possessive nouns
  • Use correct singular and plural nouns to match verbs
  • Use pronouns correctly (I, me, you, my, they, them, there, anyone)
  • Use verbs to communicate past, present, and future
  • Correctly use frequently occurring adjectives and adverbs
  • Correctly use frequently occurring prepositions
  • Produce simple and compound declarative, interrogative, imperative, and exclamatory sentences
  • Write complete simple sentences
  • Capitalize names and dates
  • Use correct end punctuation for sentences
  • Use commas in dates and series
  • Use correct spelling for grade-level words
  • Spell new words phonetically

Math

  • Count beyond 100
  • Start with any number less than 120 and count forward
  • Write a numeral to name numbers to 1,000
  • Understand place value to 99
  • Use properties of addition and subtraction (commutative, associative, identity, inverse operations)
  • Use place value and properties to add and subtract within 100
  • Skip count by twos, fives, and tens
  • Mentally add or subtract 10 from any two-digit number
  • Add and subtract multiples of 10
  • Show or write problems involving addition and subtraction
  • Solve problems (including word problems) involving addition and subtraction
  • Add and subtract within 20
  • Create and work with addition and subtraction equations
  • Find missing numbers in equations
  • Compare and describe attributes of shapes
  • Distinguish between different attributes of shapes
  • Build and draw shapes with specific attributes (such as three sides)
  • Draw or create and name two-dimensional shapes (rectangles, squares, circles, triangles, and half circles)
  • Draw or create and name three-dimensional shapes (cubes, cones, and rectangular prisms)
  • Compose two-dimensional shapes from other shapes
  • Divide circles and rectangles into two and four equal shares, using the words half and quarter
  • Measure and express length by repeated same-length units
  • Put three or more objects in order by length
  • Tell and write time in hours and half hours
  • Organize, represent, and interpret data with up to three categories on tables and simple graphs
  • Compare number of points or items in different categories

Science

  • Observe, describe, and predict patterns of motion of the sun, moon, and stars
  • Describe the 24-hour day-night cycle
  • Observe, describe, and predict seasonal patterns of sunrise and sunset
  • Identify different external animal parts and their functions
  • Identify different plant parts and the ways they help the plants
  • Describe the concept of offspring of plants and animals
  • Discuss animal features and traits that help growth and survival
  • Understand the idea that animals and plants inherit traits from their parents
  • Understand that traits vary; identify examples of varying traits

Social Science

  • Describe ways families meet basic human needs
  • Describe similarities and differences in the ways different families meet basic human needs
  • Identify examples of goods and services
  • Understand that people make and use goods and services
  • Identify ways that people exchange goods and services
  • Distinguish between wants and needs
  • Give examples of people wanting more than they can have
  • Explain sources of income and why people work
  • Discuss the idea of scarcity of goods, time, or money and the choices this requires
  • Give examples of ways physical geography affects how people earn money
  • Discuss the value and limitation of natural resources
  • Identify roles and responsibilities of authority figures in the home, school, and community
  • Describe some roles of public officials in the community, state (or province or territory), and nation
  • Discuss the concept of saving
  • Describe how technology affects communication, transportation, and the way people work
  • Understand origins of holidays, customs, and celebrations of community, state (or province or territory), and nation
  • Distinguish among past, present, and future
  • Identify contributions of key historical figures in community, state (or province or territory), and nation
  • Describe and present some stories from own family history
  • Create and analyze calendars and simple timelines
  • Describe events in terms of calendar time
  • Compare lives of people in communities past and present
  • Compare past and present technologies
  • Use terms related to sequential order of events
  • Find examples of historical fact and fiction in folktale and legends
  • Put some recent events in chronological order
  • Ask and answer historical questions about events in own life or community
  • Discuss the importance of families and communities
  • Know that families pass on knowledge, language, values, customs, and traditions
  • Identify some customs, beliefs or values, and traditions
  • Understand the importance of respect and honor within families and communities
  • Identify some ways language, customs, values, and traditions vary in different families and communities
  • Recognize ways families celebrate important events in different ways
  • Describe how technology changes the way families live
  • Discuss, give examples of, and appreciate cultural diversity
  • Describe some ways that people interact with their environments
  • Identify important locations in the community
  • Locate places using the four cardinal directions (north, south, east, west)
  • Locate self, objects, and places relative to other locations
  • Describe physical characteristics of places (landforms, bodies of water, natural resources, etc.)
  • Discuss ways that human characteristics of a place (shelter, clothing, food, activities, etc.) are connected to geographic location
  • Identify examples of and uses for natural resources in the community and state
  • Create and use simple maps of house, classroom, school, and community
  • Locate community, state (or province or territory), and country on a map or globe
  • Identify important local, state (or provincial or territorial), or national natural and human-made features
  • Explain the purpose for rules and laws in the home, school, community
  • Identify rules and laws that establish order, provide safely, and manage conflict
  • Identify some of the civic values of own family, school, and country
  • Identify and practice behaviors of a good citizen in school, family, and community
  • Identify and explain state (or provincial or territorial) and national patriotic symbols, anthems, and mottos
  • Recite the Pledge of Allegiance (U.S.A.)
  • Identify some of the leaders in own community, state (or province or territory), and country
  • Identify some roles and responsibilities of authority figures
  • Explain and practice voting as a way of making choices and decisions
  • Participate in group decisions and problem solving

Technology

  • Identify basic parts of technology systems (computer, tablet, mouse, keyboard, printer, etc.)
  • Identify and use devices for word processing and running software
  • Demonstrate beginning keyboard skills
  • Know how to open, close, save, and store files and programs
  • Demonstrate responsible care and use of digital equipment
  • Identify uses of technology in daily living
  • Use tools to access and retrieve information
  • Design original works using digital tools
  • Interact with peers, teacher, parents, or other students using digital tools
  • Use digital tools to publish individual or group creations
  • Increase awareness of other groups and cultures through technology use
  • Identify and define real-life problem or question to investigate
  • Follow a plan to locate, process, and use information digitally
  • Summarize and evaluate information gained digitally
  • Understand and practice safe, responsible use of technology
  • Practice a positive attitude toward using technology for learning
  • Show openness to learning new technologies

By the end of first grade, you can expect your child to:

  • Work independently at her desk
  • Listen to longer sets of directions
  • Read directions off the board, although some children may still have difficulty with this
  • Complete homework and bring it back the next day
  • Sit in a chair for a longer period of time
  • Be able to see things from another person’s point of view so you can reason with your child and teach her empathy
  • Relate experiences in greater detail and in a logical way
  • Problem-solve disagreements
  • Crave affection from parents and teachers
  • Have some minor difficulties with friendships and working out problems with peers
  • Distinguish left from right
  • Be able to plan ahead
  • Write words with letter-combination patterns such as words with a silent e
  • Read and write high-frequency words such as where and every
  • Write complete sentences with correct capitalization and punctuation
  • Read aloud first-grade books with accuracy and understanding
  • Count change
  • Tell time to the hour and half-hour
  • Quickly answer addition and subtraction facts for sums up to 20
  • Complete two-digit addition and subtraction problems without regrouping

Kindergarten

Kindergarten

Art

  • Experiment with musical instruments
  • Move to different musical beats and rhythms
  • Perform and create artistic movements and pattern
  • Read, write, and perform simple patterns of sounds and rhythms
  • Use voice to speak, chant, sing
  • Improvise music with instruments
  • Listen to, describe, and respond to a variety of music
  • Experience and describe music representing different cultures
  • Identify some common musical instruments by sight and sound
  • Sing age-appropriate songs with accuracy from memory
  • Act out events or stories using language and objects
  • Improvise dramatizations of stories or ideas
  • Take part in experiences in script writing, making props and sets, and acting
  • Observe patterns in nature and works of art
  • Experiment with visual art using a variety of materials and techniques
  • Create and share original works of visual art in various media and dimensions
  • Express observations, ideas, or feelings through music, drama, or visual art
  • Identify and discuss some well-known works of dance, drama, music, and visual arts and some artists, actors, writers, musicians, choreographers, or composers
  • Describe and respond to creative works
  • Learn and use vocabulary of dance, music, drama, and visual arts
  • Use several forms of art for self-expression of ideas, personality, or thoughts
  • Demonstrate appropriate audience skills while watching live performances

Health and Safety

  • Define and give examples of health choices and their consequences
  • Practice good personal hygiene
  • Take measures to prevent the spread of disease
  • Identify and make healthy food choices
  • Participate regularly in active play and other physical activities (contingent on any physical or other limitations)
  • Understand reasons to get enough sleep and relaxation
  • Learn and follow safety rules during play and daily activities (walking, being near streets, water play, riding in a car, biking, etc.)
  • Name objects that may be dangerous
  • Recognize and discuss causes and symptoms of common illnesses
  • Discuss and use behaviors to prevent poisoning
  • Know the basic structures and functions of the human body
  • Identify health services in own community
  • Distinguish between helpful and harmful situations
  • Recognize and follow practices for responding to emergencies
  • Know how to get out of house or school in event of fire
  • Use telephone in emergency; provide name, address, and telephone number
  • Show appropriate behavior during fire, earthquake, and other disaster drills
  • Display appropriate skills to identify, avoid, report, and cope with potentially dangerous situations
  • Understand and show ways to interact safely with strangers
  • Identify safe behaviors when uncomfortable or unsafe around another person
  • Show development of self-confidence and self-esteem
  • Demonstrate respect and consideration for all individuals
  • Develop resiliency and bonds with peers and adults
  • Identify, express, and manages feelings appropriately
  • Develop and display effective coping strategies
  • Avoid self-destructive behaviors
  • Show positive social and practices with peers, in home, and community
  • Show understanding of and respect for individual differences
  • Identify and discuss bullying behaviors
  • Identify and demonstrate alternative behaviors to bullying
  • Describe appropriate responses to bullying of self or others
  • Describe how to get help in solving conflicts with peers

Math

  • Count to 100 by ones and by tens
  • ŸCount forward from a given number (instead of beginning at 1)
  • Write numbers from 0 to 20
  • ŸRecognize and name written numerals to 100
  • Understand that a number represents a quantity
  • Recognize and describe the concept of zero
  • Count objects in one-to-one correspondence saying number names in order
  • Understand that each successive number name refers to a quantity one larger than the last
  • Count a number of objects from 0 to 20 and name the set with a written numeral
  • Understand that the last counting word tells “how many” in the set
  • Count to answer “How many?” about 0-20 items arranged in a line, rectangle, or circle
  • ŸCompare numbers and quantities with the words
  • Without counting, give number of objects in a set (up to four objects)
  • Estimate the number of objects in a small set
  • Describe measurable attributes of an object (height, weight, length, etc.)
  • Classify objects and count number of objects in a category
  • Compare objects in shape and size
  • Compare objects by length, weight, or capacity, using such words as longer, shorter, bigger, smaller, heavier, lighter, taller, and shorter
  • Put 3-10 objects in size order by some attribute
  • Know that units are used to measure (pounds, minutes, feet, quarts, meters, etc.)
  • Measure length with such units as toy blocks or similar objects safe for age range
  • Estimate simple measurements
  • Discuss such units of time as seconds, minutes, hours, days, weeks, and years
  • Describe positions of things in relation to other things (in, on, under, up, down inside, outside, behind, in front, between, and beside)
  • Describe positions of objects in relation to other objects
  • Ÿ Identify, name, and describe a square, circle, oval, triangle, rectangle, and hexagon
  • Ÿ Find and name shapes in the environment
  • Ÿ Identify shapes as two-dimensional (flat) or three-dimensional (solid)
  • Ÿ Create shapes and compose shapes from other shapes
  • Analyze and compare the parts and characteristics of two- and three-dimensional shapes in different sizes and positions
  • Sort items according to their shapes (regardless of size)
  • Build and draw shapes
  • Combine simple shapes into larger shapes
  • Combine shapes to create a picture or design
  • Sort and classify objects by one or more characteristics into two or more groups
  • Recognize simple repeating patterns
  • Extend and create simple repeating patterns
  • Compose and decompose numbers from 11 to 19 into ten ones and additional ones using drawings and objects
  • Ÿ Show compositions or decompositions with drawings or written equations (16 = 10 + 6)
  • Ÿ Understand that the numbers 11-19 are composed of ten ones and 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, or 9 ones
  • Geometry and Spatial Relationships
  • Represent addition and subtraction with fingers, objects, claps, drawings, explanations, or number sentences or phrases
  • ŸUnderstand addition as putting together and adding to
  • ŸUnderstand that “adding more” increases the number of objects in a set
  • ŸUnderstand subtraction as taking apart and taking from
  • ŸUnderstand that subtracting (“taking away”) items from a set makes a smaller set
  • ŸUse objects, drawings, and written number sentences to solve addition and subtraction problems within 10 (including word problems)
  • ŸDecompose numbers 0 to 10 into pairs using objects or drawings and written number sentences (6 = 4 + 2 or 6 = 3 + 3)

Language Arts

  • Look at pictures in books and pretend to read
  • Show motivation to read; ask to be read to
  • Is read to frequently
  • Has own books
  • Understand that print is something to be read and has meaning
  • Understand that spoken words are represented by written words
  • Understand that printed words are separated by spaces
  • Identify and show an interest in many different kinds of texts
  • Takes care of books; identify title, cover, author, and illustrator of book
  • Recognize that letters form words and words form sentences
  • Follow words from left to right and top to bottom
  • Recognize own name and common words in print
  • Recognize and name all uppercase and lowercase letters
  • Recite the alphabet
  • Recognize that letters have sounds
  • Pronounce the most common sound for each letter
  • Identify beginning, ending, and middle sounds in a word
  • Pronounce words, one sound at a time
  • Make new words from one-syllable words by changing a sound (cat from rat, mud from mad, lid from lip)
  • Match and produce words that rhyme
  • Hear and say separate syllables in words
  • Orally blend sounds and syllables into words
  • Read some common words by sight
  • Retell familiar stories, including key sequence and details
  • Identify events, characters, and settings in a story
  • Identify the main topic and key details in an informational text
  • Ask and answer questions about details in a text
  • Describe the relationships between pictures and text
  • Compare and contrast events or details in two stories or texts
  • Tell why an author wrote a text and how he or she accomplished the purpose
  • Tell or try to determine the meanings of simple words from texts
  • Read grade-level texts with understanding
  • Take part in group reading activities and discussions
  • Understand that writing is a way to communicate meaning
  • Print own first and last name
  • Write many uppercase and lowercase letters
  • Write letters to represent words
  • Express ideas from a text by drawing, dictating, or writing
  • Use pictures, designs, scribbles, and letters to represent events, objects, ideas, information, or stories
  • Create drawings, designs, written words, or made-up words to express opinions or preferences, or to give information
  • Use a combination of drawing, dictating, and writing to narrate a story or event
  • Use invented spelling to form words, phrases, or sentences
  • Explore digital tools to produce and publish writing
  • Participate in group research and writing projects
  • Speak clearly enough to be understood and at an appropriate volume
  • Speak in complete and increasingly complex sentences
  • Understand and use an increasing number and variety of words
  • Learn and follow age-appropriate rules of standard English grammar
  • Speak to give a point of view or opinion, and to express thoughts and feelings
  • Speak to describe, clarify, negotiate, or persuade
  • Describe familiar people, places, things, and events with some detail
  • Describe relationships among objects, events, and people
  • Tell a story
  • Retell a story or recount information gained through listening
  • Respond appropriately to questions
  • Take part in conversations with adults and peers
  • Learn and follow rules for listening, speaking, and discussing
  • Show understanding of spoken directions
  • Show attentiveness to presentations
  • Learn new vocabulary through listening
  • Put ideas in sequence after listening to a story, instructions, or an explanation
  • Make sense of pictures, symbols, and other visual features
  • Ask and answer questions about presentations heard or viewed
  • Draw conclusions based on information from digital and visual media

Science

  • Show curiosity about the world
  • Use senses and tools to observe, investigate, ask questions, solve problems, and draw conclusions
  • Describe what he or she wants to learn from a science investigation
  • Ask “Why?” “How?” and “What if?” questions
  • Try to answer how and why about what happened
  • Use measurement and other math processes to gather information
  • Collect, describe, record, and communicate information
  • Explain, predict, analyze, and generalize about a science event
  • Suggest solutions or answers and give evidence for the answers
  • Describe physical properties of soil and rocks
  • Describe characteristics of soil, water, and air
  • Observe and describe objects in space
  • Observe and describe apparent movements of objects in space
  • Describe changes in weather and seasons
  • Discuss ways the environment provides resources for people
  • Discuss some ways to protect the environment
  • Describe weather and climate in terms of sunlight, precipitation, and temperature in a region
  • Share observations of local weather
  • Notice and record weather and climate patters over time
  • Discuss ways that animals and plants change their environment
  • Draw or describe the relationship between needs of different plants and animals in the places they live (in such a setting as a desert or meadow)
  • Describe ways to reduce people’s adverse impact on land, water, air, living things
  • Describe ways people use natural resources to get things they need
  • Describe the differences between living and nonliving things
  • Describe the basic needs of living things
  • Describe sources of food for plants and animals
  • Describe sources of water and light for plants and animals
  • Understand that living things grow and change
  • Observe, describe, compare, and discuss living things
  • Match plants and animals to their habitats
  • Describe how animals resemble their parents
  • Identify ways living things change as they grow
  • Recognize seasonal changes in plants and animals
  • Name external parts of some plants and animals
  • Describe simple life cycles (butterfly or frog)
  • Show respect for living things
  • Observe, describe, and compare physical properties of objects (size, texture, shape, weight, color, freezing and melting, sinking or floating, etc.)
  • Compare and sort objects according to physical attributes
  • Identify such sources of energy as light, heat, and electricity
  • Identify solids and liquids
  • Understand that liquids take the shape of their containers
  • Describe effects of common forces (pushing and pulling, kicking, wind, gravity, magnetism, etc.)
  • Describe specific interactions between objects when they collide or touch
  • Describe effects of smaller or bigger forces
  • Observe the effects of sunlight on Earth’s surface
  • Design a structure to reduce the effects of sunlight on a specific area

Social Science

  • Identify personal family and community
  • Recognize similarities and differences in people and families
  • Discuss what it means to be a member of a family and a community
  • Describe features of communities and neighborhoods
  • Identify cultural traditions of one’s own family or community
  • Identify personal likes, dislikes, talents, and skills
  • Understand and describe self as a learner
  • Identify ways people learn from their families and communities
  • Show understanding and appreciation of diversity (racial, ethnic, religious, national origins, beliefs, traditions, family structures, etc.)
  • Describe rights and responsibilities of children as members of a family, school, community, nation, and world
  • Explain the importance of cooperation in a group
  • Understand the need for rules at home or school
  • Understand the need for laws in the community
  • Discuss routines and rules that help keep people safe and healthy
  • Identify own country, state (province or territory), and symbols such as the flag
  • Experience opportunities to vote to make simple decisions
  • Identify important cultural traditions, holidays, and symbols of one’s own country
  • Identify the capital of the country and some national holidays
  • Identify the president (head of state/head of government) of the country and some local or state (provincial or territorial) leaders
  • Tell the difference between past, present, and future events
  • Show a basic awareness of personal and family history
  • Describe ways family histories are shared and passed down
  • Describe traditions and values of own family and other families
  • Identify some important events that happened in the distant or recent past
  • Describe how things change over time
  • Put events in sequential order
  • Recognize that maps and globes are representations of the Earth’s surface
  • Describe or draw maps of own home, school, community
  • Locate home, school, community on maps
  • Use directions to describe relative locations of familiar places
  • Describe topographical features of own neighborhood or state (province or territory)
  • Become familiar with maps of the United States (or home country) and world
  • Discuss ways that people are affected by and adapt to their physical environment
  • Discuss ways people can take care of their environment
  • Understand that people need food, clothing, and shelter
  • Identify and distinguish between needs and wants
  • Discuss ways families make choices to meet their needs and wants
  • Identify examples of scarcity and choices made due to scarcity
  • Identify examples of goods and services
  • Understand that money or trade is used to get goods or services
  • Understand that money comes in different forms
  • Identify some of the ways families get money
  • Recognize jobs in the community and the work people do

Technology

  • Identify basic parts of technology systems
  • Name input and output devices
  • Identify and use applications of technology systems
  • Use basic computer skills (turn on computer, use keyboard and mouse)
  • Know and use skills and procedures for other devices (music players, tablets, smart phones, cameras, etc.)
  • Open, label, save, and close files
  • Follow directions to operate software programs
  • Operate sound recording devices
  • Identify ways technology is used in daily living
  • Listen to texts presented in electronic forms
  • Create songs, drawings, movies, or stories
  • Communicate digitally with available technology
  • Collaborate digitally with available technology
  • Know and follow age-appropriate practices for safe use of technology
  • Use accurate terminology related to technology
  • Show appropriate care and maintenance for digital equipment
  • Use technology devices for a variety of age-appropriate tasks

Courtesy of World Book

By the end of kindergarten, you can expect your child to:

  • Follow class rules
  • Separate from a parent or caregiver with ease
  • Take turns
  • Cut along a line with scissors
  • Establish left- or right-hand dominance
  • Understand time concepts like yesterday, today, and tomorrow
  • Stand quietly in a line
  • Follow directions agreeably and easily
  • Pay attention for 15 to 20 minutes
  • Hold a crayon and pencil correctly
  • Share materials such as crayons and blocks
  • Know the eight basic colors: red, yellow, blue, green, orange, black, white, and pink
  • Recognize and write the letters of the alphabet in upper- and lowercase forms
  • Know the relationship between letters and the sounds they make
  • Recognize sight words such as the and read simple sentences
  • Spell his first and last name
  • Write consonant-vowel-consonant words such as bat and fan
  • Retell a story that has been read aloud
  • Identify numbers up to 20
  • Count by ones, fives, and tens to 100
  • Know basic shapes such as a square, triangle, rectangle, and circle
  • Know her address and phone number

Courtesy of Great Schools

Preschool

Kindergarten (2)

Art

  • Participate in group movement activities
  • Move to different musical beats and rhythms
  • Dance to different types of music
  • Experiment with musical instruments
  • Participate in group music activities
  • Sing familiar songs, chants, and finger plays
  • Initiate and select music and movement activities
  • Sing familiar songs from memory and learn new songs
  • Improvise songs and rhythmic patterns
  • Use props to enhance movement captivities
  • Represent fantasy and real-life experiences through pretend play
  • Create and use props and costumes during dramatic play
  • Demonstrate an understanding of color, shape, and line
  • Participate in teacher-guided visual arts activities
  • Use a variety of art materials and techniques to make various art creations (child- safe chalk, pencils, crayons, markers, clay, playdough, paint, wood, etc.)
  • Manipulate materials with pounding, squeezing, rolling, and cutting
  • Explore ideas and themes independently with art materials
  • Use art for self-expression of ideas, personality, or thoughts
  • Show imagination and creativity in the creation of visual arts
  • Draw a self-portrait
  • Use age-appropriate digital media applications to create works of art
  • Use art tools and processes as intended
  • Show appropriate audience behavior when viewing art performances
  • Describe and respond to creative works
  • Act out events or stories using language and props

Language Arts

  • Speak clearly and audibly in complete sentences
  • Speak to give a point of view or opinion, or to persuade
  • Speak to describe, clarify, or negotiate
  • Take part in conversations with adults and peers
  • Describe relationships between objects, events, and people
  • Speak clearly enough to be understood
  • Tell a story
  • Respond appropriately to questions
  • Use language to describe events and tell stories
  • Understand and use an increasing number and variety of words
  • Learn and use age-appropriate rules of standard English grammar
  • Use increasingly complex sentences
  • Learn and follow the rules for listening, speaking, and discussing
  • Show understanding of spoken directions
  • Learn new vocabulary through listening
  • Retell a story or recount information gained through listening
  • Sequence events after listening
  • Show attentiveness to presentations
  • Make sense of pictures, symbols, and other visual features
  • Ask questions about visual presentations
  • Draw conclusions based on information from visual media
  • Express ideas from a text by drawing, dictating, or writing
  • Create drawings, signs, or designs to represent an idea or word
  • Understand that writing is a way to communicate meaning
  • Write letters or letter-like shapes to represent words
  • Use pictures, designs, scribbles, and letters to represent events, objects, ideas, or stories
  • Print own first name
  • Write some uppercase and lowercase letters
  • Use invented spelling to form words, phrases, or sentences
  • Look at pictures in books and pretend to read
  • Show motivation to read and ask to be read to
  • Is read to frequently
  • Has own books
  • Show an interest in many different kinds of texts
  • Understand that print is something to be read and has meaning
  • Connect written to spoken words
  • Ask and answer questions about print materials
  • Identify different kinds of texts
  • Retell familiar stories
  • Tell the meanings of simple words
  • Discuss books and other texts
  • Take care of books
  • Recognize own name and common words in print
  • Recognize and name most of the letters
  • Recite the alphabet
  • Match some uppercase with their corresponding lowercase letters
  • Orally blend sounds and syllables into words
  • Recognize that letters form words and words form sentences
  • Identify words related to pictures
  • Follow words from left to right and top to bottom of page
  • Recognize that letters have sounds
  • Pronounce words, one sound at a time
  • Identify beginning, ending, and middle sounds in a word
  • Match or produce words that rhyme
  • Hear and say separate syllables in words

Math

  • Understand that a number represents a quantity
  • Recognize and name some written numerals
  • Count objects in one-to-one correspondence
  • Count to recognize how many objects are in a set
  • Count numbers to 20 by ones
  • Understand that the last counting word tells “how many.”
  • Recognize and describe the concept of zero
  • Tell what number comes after a number (up to 10)
  • Without counting, give number of objects in a set (up to four objects)
  • Estimate the number of objects in a small set
  • Compare quantities in two sets of objects
  • Compare number of objects using such words as more, less, the same as, greater than, fewer, or equal
  • Understand that “adding more” increases the number of objects in a set
  • Understand that putting two sets of objects together makes a bigger set
  • Understand that subtracting (“taking away”) items from a set makes a smaller set
  • Solve simple addition and subtraction problems with a small number of objects
  • Sort and classify objects according to one or more attributes into two or more groups
  • Recognize simple repeating patterns
  • Extend and create simple repeating patterns
  • Identify and name a square, circle, triangle, and rectangle
  • Describe parts and characteristics of shapes
  • Sort items according to their shapes (regardless of size)
  • Find shapes in the environment
  • Combine and separate different shapes to create a picture or design
  • Describe positions of objects or people (in, on, under, up, down, inside, outside, behind, in front, between, beside, etc.)
  • Compare objects in shape and size
  • Compare objects by length, weight, or capacity, using such words as longer, shorter, bigger, smaller, heavier, lighter, taller, and shorter
  • Put 3-10 objects in order by size
  • Know that units are used to measure (pounds, inches, cups, meters, minutes, feet, etc.)
  • Measure length with such units as toy blocks or or similar objects safe for age range
  • Estimate simple measurements
  • Discuss units of time (seconds, minutes, hours, days, weeks, and years)

PE/Health

  • Jump, walk in a straight line and hop on one foot
  • Throw, catch, bounce, and kick a lightweight ball
  • Climb stairs using alternate feet
  • Stand on one foot for 5-10 seconds
  • Walk backward for five feet
  • Maintain balance while sitting, standing, and moving
  • Put on clothing items independently; use buttons, zippers, and snaps successfully
  • Build structures with blocks
  • Navigate age-appropriate playground equipment
  • Take part in large-motor movements, such as dancing or marching
  • Peddle a tricycle
  • Control a pencil, crayon, or paintbrush
  • Complete simple puzzles
  • Use blunt scissors and eating utensils successfully
  • Paste objects
  • Trace or copy simple shapes
  • Participate regularly in physical activities
  • Identify and compare sights, smells, sounds, tastes, and textures
  • Identify body parts and their functions
  • Show ways to prevent spreading germs
  • Recognize and follow simple practices for health and hygiene
  • Show growing independence in healthy practices (washing hands, brushing teeth,
  • using tissues, taking care of toilet need, etc.)
  • Learn, describe, and follow simple safety rules and emergency procedures
  • Know how to get help in an emergency
  • Know how to dial 9-1-1 and give name and address information

Science

  • Show curiosity about the world
  • Use senses and tools to observe, investigate, ask questions, solve problems, and draw conclusions
  • Describe what he or she wants to learn from a science investigation
  • Ask “Why?” “How?” and “What if?” questions
  • Try to answer “How?” and “Why?” about science events
  • Collect, describe, and record (write or draw) information
  • Explain, predict, and generalize about an event or experience
  • Describe the differences between living and nonliving things
  • Describe basic needs of living things
  • Understand that living things grow and change
  • Observe, describe, compare, and discuss living things
  • Match plants and animals to their habitats
  • Describe how animals resemble their parents
  • Identify ways living things change as they grow
  • Recognize seasonal changes in plants and animals
  • Name external parts of plants and animals
  • Describe simple life cycles (butterfly or frog)
  • Show respect for living things
  • Observe, describe, and compare physical properties of objects (size, texture, shape, weight, color, freezing and melting, or sinking or floating)
  • Compare and sort objects according to physical attributes
  • Identify such sources of energy as light, heat, and electricity
  • Identify and compare solids and liquids
  • Understand that liquids take the shape of their containers
  • Describe effects of common forces (pushing and pulling, kicking, wind, gravity, or magnetism)

Social/Emotional Development

  • Manage comfortably when apart from parents or primary caregivers for 2-3 hours
  • Meet visitors without excessive shyness
  • Know the full name, gender, age, and birthday
  • Know parents’ names, home address, and home phone number
  • Is not afraid to go to school
  • Describe own physical characteristics and abilities positively
  • Recognize self as a unique individual
  • Feel good about self
  • Perform many routines and tasks independently
  • Independently attempt new tasks
  • Express own feelings, needs, and opinions appropriately
  • Maintain self-control
  • Recognize and describe own and others’ emotions and behavior
  • Play with other children
  • Develop friendships with peers
  • Show empathy for peers
  • Share, take turns, and help others
  • Take part in pretend play
  • Make age-appropriate decisions and choices
  • Follow simple rules, routines, and directions
  • Move from one task to another without delay or distress
  • Cooperate with peers and family members
  • Try to resolve peer conflict
  • Take care of own belongings
  • Talk comfortably with others
  • Relate comfortably to teachers or primary caregivers
  • Minimize disruptive or aggressive behavior
  • Handle change and adapt to new situations appropriately
  • Ask for help when needed
  • Help family with chores

Social Science

  • Identify personal family and community
  • Understand that each person belongs to a family
  • Recognize similarities and differences in people and families
  • Describe own community
  • Identify cultural traditions of own family and community
  • Recognize jobs in the community, and the work people do
  • Describe or draw maps of own home, school, community
  • Name street, neighborhood, city where he or she lives
  • Locate objects and places in familiar environments
  • Describe topographical features in his or her neighborhood or state (or province, territory)
  • Discuss ways people can take care of their environment
  • Tell the difference between past, present, future events
  • Show a basic awareness of personal and family history
  • Identify events that happened in the past
  • Describe common events and routines using such words as today, tomorrow, yesterday, last week, or next week
  • Describe how things change over time
  • Put events in sequential order

Technology

  • Follow directions to operate software programs
  • Listen to texts presented in electronic forms
  • Use basic computer skills (turn on the computer, use keyboard and mouse)
  • Operates sound recording device
  • Create songs, drawings, or stories through interaction with available technology
  • Communicate digitally with available technology
  • Use the basic skills of other digital devices (mp3 player, cell phone, tablet, etc.)
  • Know age-appropriate practices for safe use of technology

Homeschooling Your Child Mini Series

Kindergarten (12)

This homeschooling mini-series for your child is to highlight the “what you need to know” aspect of schooling at home.  Homeschooling can be daunting especially if you are new to homeschooling.  There are many things that you can do, in order to, not overwhelm yourself or your child(ren).

Tips

  • Relax
  • Breathe
  • Calm the heck down
  • Do not over think this
  • Do YOUR homework
  • Become a member of the HSLDA
  • Contact your local board of education office to meet with the DPP and to hand him/her your letter of intent
  • If you are not comfortable with meeting that person, then be sure and just send your letter (preferably certified) 2 weeks prior to school starting.
  • You do not have to send a letter until your child is 6 yrs old
  • Go easy on yourself, that first year.
  • Utilize your library
  • Ask for help
  • Get involved in your local homeschool group
  • Co-Op
  • Plan field trips
  • Realize that you will not be “doing school” from 7-3…there is flexibility in the beauty of homeschooling
  • Keep the main thing, the main thing.
  • Reading, Writing, Math every day.
  • History/Science 2x per week
  • Music/Art 1x per week
  • Enjoy each other’s company

Homeschooling Mini Series

My Story

I have been homeschooling for 18 years.  I never dreamed I would *still* be doing homeschooling.  A few of my kids have attended public school for a blink of a moment.  We also tried a Christian private school…that went well (not).  I had one in military school for 6 mths.  We have also enlisted a multitude of tutors.

In the end, this is what we always come back too.  I’ve successfully graduated two children.  One child went straight from my teaching to Murray State University and graduated Summa Cum Laude.  She is now a successful young lady working out in the big bad world.  My second daughter went from me to our local college.  She is fixing to graduate with her Associate’s and this fall will begin Murray State University.  I feel like I can say that I am doing a good job and I have great kids.

You Can Do This

You can do this and you can be a success.  Your children will be fine.  They will be socialized.  You are not doing them more harm.  You are not ruining their life.  Take each semester and analyze where you are and where you want to be.  If, at the end of the semester things are not going well, put them back in school.  That is okay.  That.  Is.  Okay.  I promise.  Some people do this at the end of the year, but I take it semester by semester.  That is what works for us.

Sites Referenced

Best Schools

World Book

 

Crack. Me. Up.

Crack. Me. Up.

I cannot stop laughing at this.

Seriously.  I may need an intervention.

Sometimes, in life, we need a little humor.  After 19 years of homeschooling (as of 2018), I have to find the humor in it because, frankly, I’m over homeschooling.

I do not say that in jest.  Homeschooling began out of fear for me.  This was a decision that my husband and I made after our local high school shooting.  Fear.  Straight up.  Not conviction, not religious reasons, no other reason than I was afraid for the life of my, then, one child.

Clearly, that didn’t work out well because I hated doing it and she hated learning.  We did put her in school and her sister for a hot minute.  That didn’t go well either, sadly.  It didn’t matter how involved I was with the school, how well I liked their teachers…it just didn’t go well.

We took them back out for a long period of time and then life happened.  Adoptions happened and it was time to try again.  This time we took a different route and put them in private school.  Uhm, well, mama and the “religious powers that be” did not play well in the sandbox together.  That was another horrible experience.

Finally, we brought them home again.  I had a different perspective, a different desire, they were excited to learn, and I was excited to teach, so here we are.  Timing is everything.  I’m blessed to have moved to an area where I have mad respect for the people at the board office.  I know several principals, teachers, substitute teachers, and more.  Now, if we choose to put them in school, it will be different.

Realistically, however, I’m also aware that I have 2 children that it would be a detriment to enroll them for several different reasons.  My third child is going to graduate in May and he is on it like Donkey Kong with his work.  I have another child that would be just fine, only he is the 1% race that just is not in my community.  Identity is a huge thing and I want him to be proud to be a strong, faith-filled boy of color.  I never want him to desire to be white.  Honoring his culture, his heritage, his beginnings are so important to us, as a family.

So here I sit, grading papers for the umpteenth time today.  I’m answering math questions, language questions, life questions…and so it goes.

Homeschooling: Letter of Intent Sample

New School Year

 

**Get your homeschooling letter of intent mailed out, friends and neighbors.  Ideally, this needs to be done 2 weeks before school starts.  It is also best to send it by certified mail.  You do not have to send a letter until your child is in 1st grade.  Any younger than that is fine, but not necessary. **

I encourage you all to reach out to your local Director of Pupil Personnel and schedule a meeting.  It takes a lot of the stigma out of the “Big Bad Wolf,” so to speak.  Just share your heart, tell that person about your family, your motivation, etc.  I had a great visit with our (new to me, but his second year) DPP.

Both of us are on the same page on so many levels.  The most important thing is the children and their well-being (not just mine, all kids).  We had an outstanding visit and a better understanding of each other.

Our public school is instituting a new program called MC at Home.  This is a program where homeschoolers can still homeschool, but the curriculum, grading, test giving, falls under the heading of the public school.  You will use their curriculum if that makes sense.

This gives new homeschoolers a chance to get their feet wet or to have the flexibility (due to whatever reasons) of homeschooling, without the stressful event of choosing the “right” curriculum.   The only drawback, as I can see it (well, there is more than one, but this one in particular), is that my children *still* cannot participate in extracurricular activities or sports.

They would be under “umbrella” of our PS, but not have some of the benefits of it.  That being said, this is still a great opportunity, and it is just the first year.  I can’t even begin to imagine how great it can be when all the kinks are worked out.

Good luck to you all!

Letter of Intent Sample Letter


School Name

Your Name

Address

 

Date

Local Board of Education address

 

To Whom It May Concern,

 

This letter is to inform you of our intent to privately enroll our children in our homeschool for the 2018-2019 school year. Their names and date of birth are as follows:

List all children and their birthdates, in order.

This notice is under all applicable Kentucky Revised Statutes.

The school administration, on behalf of the students enrolled therein, expressly prohibit the release of any and all information contained in this notice, including directory information as defined in 20 U.S.C.§ 1232g (a) (5) (A), without the prior written consent of the parents of the students or of the students who have reached the age of majority. See 20 U.S.C. § 1232g (a) (5) (B).

 

 

 

Sincerely,

Your Name

 

Kindergarten Agenda

Image result for kindergarten

Please realize, this is what *I* teach my kids…..if they do not master a concept, we do it until they do, regardless of if they are in K or in 12th grade.  I have many kids with learning disabilities, so keep that in mind also.

  • Sight Words (Dolch word list)
  • Bob Books, beginning readers
  • Calendar and weather
  • Simple math (addition, subtraction)
  • Learning about different cultures (food, clothes, houses, family)
  • Community helpers (adding in field trips to those places)
  • Animal habitats (adding in field trips)
  • Continuing with rhyming
  • Reading poetry and writing poetry
  • Journaling….topic of the day (Prompts)
  • LOTS of reading
  • Basic spelling (Fry word list)
  • Creating sentences
  • Story Writing
  • Basic grammar beginning (noun, verb, adjective, conjuction, article)
  • Beginning punctuation
  • Tangrams
  • Counting up to 500 or above
  • Telling time
  • Leaf collections and learning about different types of trees
  • Continuing on our rote memorization from Preschool
  • Audio books

New School Year: New Outlook

Image result for new school year

This year, I will have 1 married and graduated college; 1 will be a junior in college and preparing for her marriage; 1 junior, 1 senior, 2 in 6th grade, and a preschooler.

What on Earth??????!!!!!!!!!

I have been homeschooling for 18 years.

That does not even seem possible.  I’ve always been a semester at a time kind of chick and I never dreamed I would HS for this long.  Last year was tough, not gonna lie.  I was a slacker, but the kids did finish up their stuff.  Hunter was diagnosed with OMS in June 2017 and that just encompassed our lives.  This year, we are moving forward and being more aggressive (or back to normal, last year was just not normal).

Noah will still be working.  He will do the first half of this senor year as normal…he will take the ACT again.  Once that score gets to where it needs to be, the second half of his senior year will be done at Murray State University.  He will be doing Racer Academy online, while finishing up what I have for him.  Grayce will be tackling 10th grade.  She has hit a bit of a plateau in some areas.  She excels in others.  She has FASD, so we push as far as we can push, but we make sure she has life skills and the basics down.  We are looking into Job Corp or Cosmetology school for her, for her future.  Daniel should be in the 7th grade, but he is behind.  He is considered MMD (mild mental deficiency) and FASD. He is also dyslexic, so his has always been an uphill battle.  I have a curriculum for him, that is specific for kids with dyslexia.  I’m going to supplement that with a ton of history (his strength), some science, Bible, and he is pretty on target for his math.  It is getting tougher, so we will just really make sure he has downpat what he knows.  Jude is on target, so we will trudge forward and try to keep his emerging tween attitude at bay.  Hunter, I have some stuff for him, but his learning will all be memorization and lots of reading.  His memory is affected by OMS and he can’t hold a pencil, so writing is out of the question.  He will also have his 3 hr therapies, once a week.

I hope to get up the curriculum that I will be using, this year.  I also want to add in some freebie sites that we will be using or even free apps.  I have ideas swirling and twirling around in my brain…just got to get it all out on paper and then I can write about it.

Never a dull moment!

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