Homeschooling

Third Grade

Kindergarten (2)

Arts

  • Perform and create artistic movements and patterns
  • Identify melody, rhythm, harmony, and timbre in musical selections
  • Respond to sounds and sound patterns with body movements
  • Improvise music with classroom instruments
  • Listen, describe, and respond to a variety of music
  • Read and write patterns with musical notes
  • Identify some common musical instruments by sight and sound
  • Identify some musical forms
  • Sing age-appropriate songs with accuracy from memory
  • Improvise dramatizations of stories or ideas
  • Take part in writing scripts, designing sets, and performing group dramas
  • Create costumes and props for a performance
  • Observe patterns in nature and works of art
  • Identify and describe elements in works of visual art (line, color, texture, shapes/form, space, value)
  • Create original works of visual art in various media and dimensions
  • Express observations, ideas, or feelings through music, drama, or visual art
  • Identify and discuss some well-known works of dance, drama, music, or visual arts and some artists, actors, writers, musicians, choreographers, or composers
  • Analyze a variety of works of dance, music, drama, and visual arts
  • Learn and use vocabulary of dance, music, drama, and visual arts
  • Describe techniques for a given form of art
  • Compare and contrast two works of art
  • Understand how culture affects art and how art reflects culture
  • Demonstrate appropriate audience skills for live artistic performances

Health and Safety

  • Concept and examples of health choices and their consequences
  • Influences on health choices (peers, media, family, community, culture)
  • Elements of and reasons for good personal hygiene
  • Types of nutrients and healthy choices for food
  • Regular participation in active play and other physical activities (contingent on any physical or other limitations)
  • Reasons to get enough sleep and relaxation
  • Strategies for a personal health plan
  • Safety rules for daily and recreational activities (walking, being near streets, water play, riding in a car, biking, etc.)
  • Ways to prevent common childhood injuries (including poisoning)
  • Basic structures and functions of the human body
  • Symptoms of common illnesses; causes of diseases
  • Ways body defends against germs
  • Measures to prevent spread of disease
  • Practicing procedures for response to emergencies, including using telephone
  • Getting out of house or school in event of fire
  • Appropriate skills to identify, avoid, and cope with potentially dangerous situations
  • Identify safe behaviors around strangers
  • Harmful effects of tobacco, alcohol, and drugs on health
  • Understanding of human development and changes
  • Development of self-confidence and self-esteem
  • Respect and consideration for all individuals
  • Ways to identify, express, and manage feelings appropriately
  • Positive social practices with peers, in home, and community
  • Differences between tattling and reporting
  • Bullying, alternative behaviors to bullying, and appropriate responses to bullying
  • Strategies for resolving conflicts with peers and others
  • Skills for meeting people, making friends, and being a good friend
  • Getting personal support from family; communication with family
  • How and where to get help in making health decisions

Language Arts

  • Identify main topic, idea, lesson, moral, or argument in grade-level text
  • Show understanding of key details in a text
  • Identify text evidence to support the author’s message or reader’s responses
  • Retell stories, including tales from diverse cultures
  • Describe characters in a story and how characters’ actions contribute to the plot
  • Determine meanings of words or phrases as used in a text
  • Describe effects and uses of words and phrases in passages
  • Describe overall structure of a passage and its effect on the message
  • Describe how parts of a story, poem, or drama build on other parts
  • Use text features and search tools to locate relevant information
  • Explain connections between events, ideas, concepts, or steps in a text
  • Explain differences in points of view of characters, narrators, or writers
  • Explain differences between an author’s point of view and their own
  • Explain how visual images and graphics contribute to and clarify a text
  • Compare and contrast themes, settings, plots, or ideas in two texts on the same topic or by the same author
  • By the end of the academic year, read and understand grade-level literary and informational texts at grade level independently and with proficiency
  • Express ideas and feelings clearly
  • Speak clearly and audibly in sensible sentences
  • Describe people, places, things, and events with relevant details
  • Add visual components to a speech to clarify ideas, feelings, and thoughts
  • Give and follow simple two-step directions
  • Participate in conversations with diverse partners and groups
  • Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions
  • Listen and respond to others with focus and care
  • Ask and answer questions about key details in a text or in an oral presentation
  • Present a report or tell a story with appropriate facts and relevant details
  • Create audio recordings of stories or poems
  • Apply grade-level phonics and word analysis skills in reading words
  • Know meanings of most common prefixes and suffixes
  • Decode irregularly spelled grade-level words and multi-syllable words
  • Read grade-level texts with purpose and understanding
  • Orally read grade-level texts with accuracy, expression, and appropriate rate
  • Confirm and self-correct words during oral reading
  • Use context clues to determine word and phrase meanings
  • Use word structure clues to determine word meanings
  • Use synonyms and antonyms to clarify and explain word meanings
  • Use dictionaries and glossaries (print and digital) to determine or clarify word meaning
  • Understand and use figurative language (similes, metaphors, idioms, adages, proverbs, etc.)
  • Distinguish literal and nonliteral meanings of words in context
  • Distinguish shades of meanings among related words
  • Learn and use grade-level general academic vocabulary
  • Identify nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs and their functions in specific sentences
  • Form and use regular and irregular nouns and verbs and verb tenses
  • Form and use conjunctions, superlative adjectives, and superlative adverbs
  • Produce complete simple, compound, and complex sentences
  • Capitalize proper nouns and appropriate words in titles
  • Use end punctuation, commas, and apostrophes
  • Punctuate dialogue correctly
  • Use grade-level spelling patterns and rules
  • Consult reference materials to check spellings
  • Correctly use the English language when speaking, reading, or writing
  • Know when to use formal and informal English
  • Write opinion, informative, or explanatory pieces that state a topic or purpose, supply relevant facts and reasons, and present a conclusion
  • Write stories that include details, put events in order, and provide a conclusion
  • Make improvements and needed changes to written work
  • Use transitional words and phrases to connect ideas
  • Add dialogue and descriptions to develop characters and events
  • Take part in shared research and writing projects
  • Conduct short research task on a topic or question
  • Gather information from print and digital sources and take notes
  • Create written and visual works to summarize and share information
  • Use tools, including digital tools, to produce and publish writing
  • Write regularly for a variety of tasks, purposes, and audiences

Math

  • Tell and write time to nearest minute
  • Solve word problems involving addition and subtraction of time
  • Measure and estimate liquid volumes and masses of objects
  • Solve word problems involving four operations with masses or volumes
  • Generate measurement data, measuring lengths to halves and fourths of an inch
  • Understand how concepts of area relate to multiplication and to addition
  • Recognize and measure perimeter
  • Measure areas by counting unit squares
  • Multiply side lengths to find areas of rectangles in real-world problems
  • Recognize area as additive
  • Solve real-world and mathematical problems involving perimeters of polygons
  • Use tiles and pictures to represent areas
  • Understand that data are sets of individual numerical facts or measurements
  • Interpret information and solve problems from data on graphs and tables
  • Draw a picture graph or scaled bar graph to represent a set of data
  • Understand products as total number of objects in a number of same-size groups
  • Understand quotients as the number of objects in each share when a total is equally partitioned
  • Understand division as a problem of finding an unknown factor
  • Know from memory all products of two one-digit numbers
  • Apply commutative, associative, and distributive properties to multiply and divide
  • Multiply and divide fluently within 100
  • Find unknown numbers in multiplication or division problems within 100
  • Use drawings and equations with a symbol to represent an unknown number
  • Solve two-step word problems involving the four operations
  • Identify arithmetic patterns (5 times a number always ends in 5 or 0)
  • Assess the reasonableness of answers (using estimation and mental calculation)
  • Understand a fraction as a quantity formed when a whole is partitioned into equal parts
  • Understand that a unit fraction (1/b) is the quantity formed by one part when the whole is partitioned into b equal parts
  • Represent fractions on a number line diagram
  • Compare fractions by reasoning about their size
  • Explain the concept of fraction equivalence
  • Recognize and generate simple equivalent fractions
  • Create models to show equivalent fractions
  • Identify and describe a variety of 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional shapes
  • Understand that shapes in different categories may share attributes
  • Understand that rectangles, rhombuses, squares, and trapezoids are all quadrilaterals
  • Categorize shapes by their attributes
  • Partition shapes into equal areas, describing each part as a unit fraction of the whole (for a shape partitioned into 6 parts with equal area, each part is 1/6 of the whole)
  • Understand and use place value to 1,000
  • Round numbers to the nearest 10 or 100
  • Add and subtract within 1,000 using place value understandings
  • Multiply one-digit whole numbers by multiples of 10

Science

  • Weather and climate patterns and predictions
  • Climate variations
  • Natural hazards resulting from natural processes
  • Life cycles of plants and animals
  • Plant and animal adaptation and survival
  • Plant and animal behaviors
  • Learned and inherited traits of living things
  • Variations of inherited traits
  • Relationships between traits of organisms and their survival
  • Influence of environment on plant and animal traits
  • Relationships in an ecosystem
  • Effects of environmental changes on organisms in the environment
  • Animal behavior and social interactions
  • Evidence of extinct plant and animals
  • Biodiversity
  • Physical properties of matter (size, shape, weight, volume, flexibility, luster, color, texture, hardness, odor, etc.)
  • Forms of energy (heat, sound, chemical, mechanical, and electrical)
  • Heat release and transfer
  • Energy transformations (such as heat to light)
  • Interactions of matter and energy
  • Sound (pitch, vibrations, volume) and how sound travels
  • Sizes and kinds of forces, including gravity
  • Relationships between force and motion
  • Effects of balanced and unbalanced forces on an object
  • Patterns and measurements of an object’s motion
  • Electric or magnetic interactions between objects not in contact with each other
  • Simple machines

Social Science – World Communities

  • Uniqueness of the history of each community or culture
  • Ways cultural history is passed from one generation to the next (legends, oral histories, folktales, etc.)
  • Key events in history of selected world communities
  • Key places and people in history of selected world communities
  • Timelines of historical features of selected world communities
  • Technological developments in transportation and communication in selected world communities
  • Development of trade in selected world communities
  • Available resources, human and natural, for the selected world community
  • How the selected community uses resources to meet basic needs and wants
  • Concepts of surplus and scarcity in relation to the selected community
  • Ways of meeting basic needs of food, clothing, and shelter in the selected community
  • Ways people earn a living now and in the past in the selected community
  • Goods and services produced in each selected community
  • Goods products or services exported and imported in the selected community
  • The role of trade in the selected community
  • Comparison of family and school activities in own community with those of selected world communities
  • Comparison of cultural traditions in own community with those of selected world communities
  • Components of culture and diversity of communities (language, customs, traditions, beliefs, practices, celebrations)
  • Cultural features, traditions, and symbols of selected world communities
  • Arts, music, dance, and literature of selected world communities
  • Concept of cultural diffusion and how it happens
  • Comparison of effects of cultural communities in selected world communities on people, ideas, practices, and products
  • Earth’s equator, hemispheres, continents, and oceans
  • Earth’s regions
  • Earth’s grid system (lines of latitude and longitude)
  • Understanding of map features and use, including scale
  • Comparing locations of selected world communities to one’s own country
  • Use of a variety of maps to locate and examine selected world communities
  • Political and physical features of selected communities
  • Ways physical and climate features influence people in selected communities
  • Use of maps to identify one’s own location and relative locations
  • Location of one’s own local land, regions, river systems, and highways
  • Physical and human features of state (or province, territory) and neighboring states (or provinces, territories)
  • How geographical features affect population patterns
  • Human adaptations to the geography of the specified world community
  • Construction of maps, tables, graphs, charts
  • Concept of democracy and principles of democratic government
  • Type of government in the selected community; comparison to other governments
  • How leaders are chosen in the selected world community
  • How problems are solved in the selected world community
  • Ways the government keeps people safe, maintains order, provides for needs
  • Role of citizens in the selected community
  • Concept of universal human rights of fair treatment and fulfillment of needs
  • Examination of the concept of human rights in the selected community

Technology

  • Concepts, characteristics, and real-life uses of technology
  • Basic parts of technology systems and basic technological devices
  • Continued development of keyboard skills
  • Opening, closing, saving, sending, and storing files, applications, and programs
  • Effective use of available grade-level technology
  • Use of tools and devices to complete tasks and solve problems
  • Use of tools to produce creative original works
  • Use of tools to interact and exchange ideas with peers, teacher, parents, or other students
  • Use of tools and devices to develop cultural understanding
  • Use of tools to access information for an inquiry project
  • Exploring virtual environments, simulations, programs, models, and applications
  • Participation in group collaborative interactive projects and activities
  • Developing, printing, and publishing in print and digital formats
  • Evaluating content, applications, and programs
  • Digital citizenship, etiquette, fair use guidelines, and copyrights
  • Practice of safe online behavior
  • Responsible care of digital equipment
  • Positive attitudes toward technology for learning
  • Demonstrating openness to learning and using new technologies

By the end of third grade, you can expect your child to:

  • Work cooperatively and productively with other children in small groups to complete projects
  • Understand how choices affect consequences
  • Become more organized and logical in her thinking processes
  • Build stronger friendships
  • Be helpful, cheerful, and pleasant as well as rude, bossy, selfish, and impatient
  • Be more influenced by peer pressure because friends are very important at this stage
  • Like immediate rewards for behavior
  • Be able to copy from a chalkboard
  • Be able to write neatly in cursive because the small muscles of the hand have developed
  • Read longer stories and chapter books with expression and comprehension
  • Use prefixes, suffixes, and root words and other strategies to identify unfamiliar words
  • Multiply single- and multi-digit numbers
  • Divide multi-digit numbers by one-digit numbers
  • Tell time to the half-hour and quarter-hour and to five minutes and one minute

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