Homeschooling

Second Grade

Kindergarten (1)

Arts

  • Perform and describe movement activities
  • Imitate simple movement patterns; learn simple dances
  • Create and demonstrate improvised movements
  • Read, write, and perform simple patterns of sounds and rhythms
  • Describe musical forms
  • Read and write patterns with musical notes
  • Identify some musical instruments by sight and sound
  • Sing age-appropriate songs with accuracy
  • Play accompaniments on classroom instruments
  • Improvise simple rhythms
  • Dramatize or improvise simple stories
  • Act out events or stories using language and props
  • Describe patterns in nature and works of art
  • Create and share original works of visual art in various media and dimensions
  • Create two- and three-dimensional works of art
  • Mix colors; draw or paint a still life
  • Use visual and actual texture in original works of art
  • Express observations, ideas, or feelings through music, drama, or visual art
  • Identify and discuss some well-known works of dance, drama, music, and visual arts and some artists, actors, writers, musicians, choreographers, or composers
  • Learn and use vocabulary of dance, music, drama, and visual arts
  • Describe and respond to works of visual art
  • Observe and respond to dance, music, and drama productions
  • Demonstrate appropriate audience skills for live performances

Health and Safety

  • Define and give examples of health choices and their consequences
  • Practice good personal hygiene
  • Take measures to prevent spread of disease
  • Identify and make healthy food choices
  • Discuss how food choices are influenced by peers, media, family, and community
  • Identify types of play and exercise that are good for the body
  • Participate regularly in active play and other physical activities (contingent on any physical or other limitations)
  • Understand reasons to get enough sleep and relaxation
  • Follow safety rules during play and daily activities (walking, being near streets, water play, riding in a car, biking, etc.)
  • Discuss and practice ways to prevent common childhood injuries, including poisoning
  • Name objects that may be dangerous
  • Recognize and discuss symptoms of common illnesses and diseases
  • Explain causes and symptoms of common illnesses and diseases
  • Know the basic structures and functions of the human body
  • Identify in simple terms ways body defends against germs
  • Identify health services in own community
  • Distinguish between helpful and harmful situations
  • Recognize and follow practices for responding to emergencies
  • Know how to use a telephone in an emergency; provide name, address, telephone number
  • Know how to get out of house or school in event of fire
  • Show appropriate behavior during fire, earthquake, and other disaster drills
  • Display appropriate skills to identify, avoid, report, and cope with potentially dangerous situations
  • Identify safe behaviors around strangers
  • Identify ways to get help if feeling unsafe, threatened, or abused
  • Explain and practice refusal skills to avoid unsafe behavior situations
  • Show development of self confidence and self esteem
  • Demonstrate respect and consideration for all individuals
  • Develop and display effective communication skills in social interactions
  • Identify, express, and manage feelings appropriately
  • Show positive social and practices with peers, in home, and community
  • Show understanding of and respect for individual differences
  • Identify and discuss bullying behaviors and alternative behaviors to bullying
  • Describe appropriate responses to bullying of self or others
  • Describe how to get help in solving conflicts with peers
  • Explain and practice skills for meeting people and making friends

Language Arts

  • Know sounds for two letters that represent one sound
  • Read regularly spelled one-syllable words (words that follow general spelling rules)
  • Know that a final e teams up with a common vowel to make long vowel sounds
  • Identify number and separation of syllables
  • Break words into syllables to help with reading
  • Read words with inflectional endings
  • Recognize and read many grade-appropriate words with regular and irregular spellings
  • Create new words with two- or three-letter initial sounds
  • Use phonics and word analysis skills to read unknown words
  • Identify main topic, idea, or argument in grade-level text
  • Show understanding of key details in a text
  • Find evidence in the text to support the author’s message or reader’s responses
  • Retell stories including tales from diverse cultures
  • Describe main message, lesson, or moral from stories or other texts
  • Describe actions and responses of characters in a story
  • Determine meanings of words or phrases relevant to the topic
  • Describe effects and uses of words and phrases in passages
  • Describe overall structure of a passage and its effect on the message
  • Find connections between a series of events, ideas, concepts, or steps in a text
  • Identify differences in points of view of characters
  • Explain how visual images and graphics contribute to and clarify a text
  • Compare and contrast different versions of the same story or texts on the same topic
  • Use texts to find information and answer questions following a step-by-step inquiry process
  • Take part in shared research and writing projects, gathering information for a specific purpose
  • Demonstrate the ability to discuss, clarify, and summarize
  • By the end of the academic year, read and understand grade-level literary and informational text at grade level independently and with proficiency
  • Use legible printing skills
  • Correctly use collective nouns, regular and irregular plural nouns, reflexive pronouns, adjectives, and adverbs
  • Produce complete simple and compound sentences
  • Capitalize names, including holidays, product names, and geographic names
  • Use end punctuation, commas, and apostrophes
  • Use simple, common spelling rules for age level
  • Use of beginning dictionaries and other reference materials
  • Correctly use the English language when speaking, reading, or writing
  • Know when to use formal and informal English
  • Apply grade-level phonics and word analysis skills in reading words
  • Decode irregularly spelled grade-level words
  • Read grade-level texts with purpose and understanding
  • Orally read grade-level texts with accuracy, expression, and appropriate rate
  • Confirm and self-correct words during oral reading
  • Write opinion, informative, or explanatory pieces that state a topic or purpose, supply relevant facts and reasons, and give a conclusion
  • Write stories that include details, put events in order, and provide a conclusion
  • Make improvements and needed changes to written work
  • Use tools, including digital tools, to produce and publish writing
  • Take part in shared research and writing projects
  • Gather information from various sources to answer a question
  • Create written and visual works to summarize and share information
  • Express ideas and feelings clearly
  • Speak clearly and audibly in sensible sentences
  • Describe people, places, things, and events with relevant details
  • Add illustrations, graphics, or other visual components) to a speech to clarify ideas, feelings, and thoughts
  • Give and follow simple two-step directions
  • Participate in conversations with diverse partners and groups
  • Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions
  • Listen to and respond to others with focus and care
  • Ask and answer questions about key details in a text or in an oral presentation
  • Tell an experience with appropriate facts, relevant details
  • Create audio recordings of stories or poems

Math

  • Represent (with equations, drawings, or objects) and solve 1- or 2-step addition and subtraction problems within 100
  • Mentally add and subtract within 20 fluently
  • Work with equal groups of objects to build foundations for multiplication
  • Use addition to find total number of objects arranged in rectangular arrays of rows and columns
  • Choose appropriate tools and units to measure lengths
  • Measure and estimate lengths using inches, feet, centimeters, and meters
  • Measure to compare lengths of objects
  • Solve addition and subtraction word problems involving same-unit lengths
  • Write an equation to represent a problem, using a symbol for the unknown number
  • Represent whole numbers as lengths on a number line
  • Represent sums and differences within 100 on a number line
  • Tell and write time (using a.m. and p.m.) to the nearest five minutes
  • Explain relationships between seconds, minutes, hours, and days
  • Understand the values and relationships among dollar bills and coins (or local denominations)
  • Solve word problems involving dollar bills and coins (or local denominations)
  • Generate measurement data
  • Represent data on a bar graph or circle graph
  • Analyze and solve problems with data on line plots, picture graphs, or bar graphs
  • Recognize and draw shapes with specified attributes
  • Identify triangles, quadrilaterals, pentagons, hexagons, cubes
  • Partition a rectangle into rows and columns of same size squares
  • Describe a whole as two halves, three thirds, or four fourths
  • Read, write, count, and compare numbers up to 1,000
  • Identify a number as odd or even
  • Understand and explain place value through one thousands
  • Understand 100 as a bundle of ten tens
  • Understand 100 as referring to one hundred, 0 tens, and 0 ones
  • Skip count by twos, fives, tens, and hundreds within 1,000
  • Understand the concept of zero
  • Write numbers up to four digits in expanded form to show place value (Example: 1,234 = 1,000 + 200 + 30 + 4)
  • Mentally add 10 to or subtract 10 from any given number 100-1,000
  • Use understanding of place value and properties of operations to add and subtract
  • Add and subtract within 1,000 using models, drawings, or place value strategies
  • Estimate sums and differences with multiples of 10 or 100

Science

  • History of planet Earth
  • Changes in Earth and Earth’s surface (slow and fast)
  • Changes caused by wind and water
  • Ideas about ways to slow or prevent changes from wind and water
  • Roles, descriptions, and locations of water (including ice) on Earth’s surface
  • Formation, properties, components, and types of soil
  • Physical properties and classifications of rocks
  • Biodiversity of living things in any region
  • Plant needs, parts, functions, and structures
  • Plant growth and pollination
  • Plant reproduction
  • Inherited traits in plants
  • Plant life cycles and life spans
  • Plant responses to environment
  • Different states of matter: solid, liquid, gas
  • Description and classification of matter by observable properties
  • Effects of temperature on matter
  • Changes in states of matter
  • Relative positions of objects
  • Forces: push and pull
  • Relationships between force and motion
  • Characteristics and effects of gravity

Social Science

  • Native American tribes in various regions of North America (or indigenous peoples of home continent [Africa, Antarctica, Asia, Australia, Europe, South America, Oceania/Pacific Islands])
  • Impact of European immigrants on Native American life (or impact of European and other immigrants on indigenous peoples of home continent [Africa, Antarctica, Asia, Australia, Europe, South America, Oceania/Pacific Islands])
  • Reasons people came to America and the United States (or home country) throughout history
  • Importance of Ellis Island and Statue of Liberty
  • Current and continuing immigration to the United States (or home country)
  • Cultural influences and contributions of immigrants
  • Terms and measures of time sequence
  • Origins and significance of community, state (or provincial, territorial), and national landmarks
  • Sequencing events and using time period designations
  • Using vocabulary related to chronologyKey people, events, and developments in own community and region
  • People in the past who have influenced community developments
  • Comparison of local history to other communities or region
  • Settling of people–why and where
  • Time periods (decades, centuries, millennia)
  • Creating and interpreting timelines for past and present events
  • Key historical figures and their contributions to U.S. (home country) history
  • Major inventions and their effects
  • Local history and people
  • Effects of science and technology through history
  • Needs for rules, laws, and services in a community
  • How groups solve problems and promote justice
  • Appropriate and inappropriate uses of power
  • Names and roles of some current pubic officials, including local leaders
  • Characteristics (and practices) of responsible citizenship
  • Reasons for and functions of government
  • Government services in the community
  • Ways groups resolve conflicts or differences
  • Elections and the voting process; participation in voting
  • Purpose and collection of taxes
  • Symbols, individuals, events, and documents that represent the United States (or home country)
  • Basic understandings of the purpose of the United States Constitution (or similar document in home country)
  • Some principles of democracy in the United Sates (or home country)
  • Rights in the United States (or home country) and guarantees of rights
  • Elements of culture
  • Culture as a reflection of the life, beliefs, and values of the people
  • Significance of art, literature, dance, music in a culture
  • Significance of various ethnic and cultural celebrations
  • Contributions of various cultures to a society
  • Effects of science and technology on human life and culture
  • Relative location of home and community in state (or province or territory), nation, and world
  • Using geographic terms and tools to describe space and place
  • Using, interpreting, and creating maps (including digital) and globes
  • Using cardinal directions (north, south, east, west) to locate places
  • Physical and human features of specific communities (including own)
  • Labeling continents, oceans, North and South Poles, equator, and prime meridian
  • Location of countries and major features in home continent (Africa, Antarctica, Asia, Australia, Europe, North America, South America, Oceania/Pacific Islands)
  • Relationships between physical geography and people’s lives and activities
  • Settlement patterns and their connections to geography
  • Population density
  • Natural resources of a place, including human resources
  • Ways people can conserve and replenish natural resources
  • Urban, suburban, and rural communities
  • Limitation of resources leading to economic choices
  • Supply of goods and services based on consumer demands
  • National trade to exchange goods and services
  • Personal costs and benefits of saving and spending
  • Differences between producing and consuming
  • Roles of producers and consumers in production of goods and services
  • Value of work and reasons people work
  • Tracing the development of a product from a natural resource to finished product
  • Saving to reach financial goals
  • Local businesses and their goods and services
  • Identifying resources, including human resources
  • Interdependence of people, regions, and nations in economic activities

Technology

  • Identify basic parts of technology systems (computer, tablet, mouse, keyboard, printer, etc.)
  • Identify and use devices for word processing and running software
  • Demonstrate beginning keyboard skills
  • Know how to open, close, save, and store files and programs
  • Demonstrate responsible care and use of digital equipment
  • Identify uses of technology in daily living
  • Use tools to access and retrieve information
  • Design original works using digital tools
  • Interact with peers, teacher, parents, or other students using digital tools
  • Use digital tools to publish individual or group creations
  • Increase awareness of other groups and cultures through technology use
  • Identify and define real-life problem or question to investigate
  • Follow a plan to locate, process, and use information digitally
  • Summarize and evaluate information gained digitally
  • Understand and practice safe, responsible use of technology
  • Practice a positive attitude toward using technology for learning
  • Show openness to learning new technologies

By the end of second grade, you can expect your child to:

  • Begin to reason and concentrate
  • Improve his ability to process information
  • Work cooperatively with a partner or small group
  • Understand the difference between right and wrong
  • Make connections between concepts so he will be better able to compare and contrast ideas
  • Expand his vocabulary
  • Read fluently with expression
  • Recognize most irregularly spelled words such as because and upon
  • Begin to use a dictionary
  • Add single- and multi-digit numbers with regrouping
  • Tell time to the quarter-hour
  • Know the concept of multiplication (for example, 2 x 3 is two rows of three)

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