Posted in Everyday

What we DON’T talk about

I suffer from depression.

I walk with the Lord.

I take medication for my depression.

I believe that the Lord will deliver me from depression or He will use it for His glory.

I have been in therapy to help me with depression.

I color my hair pink….cause I want too.

I am a mom of 6.

I am a wife of 1.

I love the Lord.

I cry, alone.

I sleep when I’m sad.

I refuse to be quiet.

I am created in Jesus’ image.

I am loved fiercely.

I love fiercely.

There are some days I want to run down the road screaming at the top of my lungs.

There are days when I can’t see the light at the end of the tunnel.

This does NOT define me.

I WILL PRAY for the Lord to break this generational curse in me so my children do not suffer from depression.

If my children do exhibit signs/symptoms of depression, I will still love them and I will help them.

I am not ashamed.

I am a survivor.

If you struggle with depression PLEASE seek good Christian counseling from a pastor, a therapist, friend or family member.  Talk to your doctor and NEVER feel “less” of a person because you don’t think or feel the way other people think and feel.

Never be ashamed of taking medication for depression.

Pray.

I am who I am and I am not going to apologize for it.

You are loved.

You are worthy.

You are good enough.

DEPRESSION FACTS:

DEPRESSION affects 1 in 10 people.

80% of people who present with clinical symptoms DO NOT get treatment.

The number of patients diagnosed with depression increases by 20% every year.

1 in 10 women experience a type of depression after giving birth.

More women suffer with depression than men.

60-80% of all cases can be effectively treated with brief structured forms of psychotherapy and antidepressant medications.

121 MILLION people, worldwide, suffer from some type of depression.

Why don’t people talk about mental illnesses like depression, bipolar disorder and suicide?

Stigma and lack of understanding are the main reasons depression remains a topic we avoid. People suffering from depression fear others will think they’re crazy or weak, or somehow a lesser person. Cultural norms are slowly changing, and people are becoming more aware of the nature of depressive illnesses and their impact on a person’s well being. Education will help reduce stigma and save lives.

Alcoholism, drug addiction, HIV and AIDS are examples of medical conditions previously attributed to a weakness or character problems. Today, they are widely recognized as medical diseases and people feel comfortable openly discussing the impact of the disease and seeking help through a variety of treatments. The dangers of alcohol and substance abuse have been the subject of major national public health campaigns in the United States, leading to a general public more aware of the value of prevention. Breast cancer is another medical illness that for many years went unspoken, but today receives millions of dollars in research funding, supportive programming and awareness. Issues of medical illnesses in the brain which we call mental illnesses still face huge obstacles to funding, support and awareness, but progress is being made.

 

Author:

This is our journey of adoption, love, homeschooling and living life to the fullest.....even if we do live in chaos (can't have anyone over syndrome).

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